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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

Loco constructed in Brass, whitemetal and nickel silver.
Presision paints single etch primer appied no problems.
Presision paints crimson lake applied with spray no problems.
Crimson lake areas masked.
Black areas sprayed with ordinary "Hycote" dull black, wherever the precision paint was (over spray areas) it immeadiatly crazed and detachtd from the primer. Primer coat intact and not affected.

Done a number of tests with other colours in the Precision range and always the same effect, whether brushed or sprayed.

"Hycote" is a general paint suitable for both plastics and metal guaranteed to not react with Acrylic of cellulose based paints.

Sent a query to Precision paints about this but NO RESPONSE any one else had problems.

Robert
 

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Hi Robert

well if you don't mind me saying the first thing is after the etching primer you should of put the black on, as the hycote paint uses a different thinners in it which reacts with the precision paints, it may react with the etch primer (I don't use etch primer so I wouldn't know) then mask of the black then paint over with the main colour, don't try to get the finished paint finish with the paints that you use (if possible use gloss all over even for black) as if you need to apply decals, you will need to give it a coat of gloss varnish apply decals or lining and then a coat of satin to seal the decals and protect the paint, then when that's hardened with an air brush firstly with mat varnish air brush the smoke box and cab roof and with normal colours weather to your liking and that should do you.

I hope this is usfull to you

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
[quote name='Peter_Harvey' date='29 Mar 2007, 07:33' post='25835']
Hi Robert

well if you don't mind me saying the first thing is after the etching primer you should of put the black on, as the hycote paint uses a

Hi Pete
Thanks I had come to the same conclusion that I would need to put the black on first let it dry and then mask and apply the crimson lake.
Just easire to mask the crimson lake rather than the black. I have never had this happen to me before, like you I think it must be the thinners in the Hycote reacting with the precsiion paint. It happens so quick it must be the thinners and if I let the Hycote dry I can apply precision paints over it without problems. I do not think it is the propellant used by Hycote as these are mostly butane based these days.

Thanks for all the tips about the different varnishs to use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
QUOTE (Peter_Harvey @ 29 Mar 2007, 12:24) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Ok Robert I hope that it will all work out for you let me know how it goes post some pictures of the result?

Peter
Peter

If you do not use the etching primer what do you use?
I was always understanding that you had to use an etching primer with brass, etc, due to the oxide layer always forming on the brass.
Etching primer is however difficult to apply in a smooth coat as it reacts with the brass and "drys" very quickly as a result.
Robert
 

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I wash the model to make sure that all of the solder residue is removed and then I use ether red oxide for black and other dark colours,
grey for green or other light colours and white also for light colours such as blues/ ocars or stroudly colours.
I mist admit that I have not made a 90% brass model yet most of mine are DJH kits on which all the chassis are hand painted so all of the upper part of the model is white metal.

Pete
 

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Most of the US all brass models I have a laqueur coat over the brass. I always strip this off as early models I painted just flaked off over time. I strip this off with laqueur thinners then wash and dry the model with a hairdryer. I then apply a base coat of two pack aluminimum etch primer. This drys to a forest green colour and works well with enamel, oil or acrylic based paints. I have never tried cellulose based paints so I don't know how it would react with that sort of paint.

Ozzie21

QUOTE (pedromorgan @ 30 Mar 2007, 15:45) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>yes you should use etching primer unless the model is laquered. the bachmann O gauge stuff for example is laquered to make it look all sparkly when you first open it. you can remove it but its a pain in the neck so i have done a model just using a good undercoat over the laquer.

Peter
 
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