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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i got my old trix twin set out with it's three rail set up. bought a few used trains off ebay, lima, hornby, mainline and graham farish oo. my trix locos are showing their vintage, they run but wobble. must say how impressed i am with lima, quite easy to service too. i bought some peco set track code 100 and was surprised to find that the hornby, which ran well on the trix track didn't work so well and the mainline didn't like it much either. lima locos were fine. any comment welcome.
 

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Wow, you really were going back in time! The four definitely extinct brands first.
Did the Graham Farish OO include a loco, or was it just rolling stock? It would be a major triumph getting one of their two pole motored OO locos running well. The rolling stock was OK-ish of its time, but the plastic used has a tendency to embrittlement.
Trix twin ( and the later Trix two rail) loco construction has a reputation of fragility, especially mechanisms, with driven wheels often loose on axles, thus the wobbling.
Mainline locos looked very well, but with a few exceptions, the mechanisms were flaky: split chassis steam loco drives and tender drives, both with weak pancake motors, and a tendency for the plastics in the mechanisms to embrittle and crack even if left unused, resulting in reduced operational life as gears fail or the wheels shift on the plastic muffs in each axle assembly..
Lima, also specialists in pancake motors, and rattly gear trains. But the diesel model power bogies do last well, and provided they get power the motors do rattle the model along. The frequent weaknesses, too few power pick ups, and internal wiring that looks like it was made from random factory floor sweepings. Much improvement is possible by DIY.

'Hornby' covers the largest range of time to present. Is this Hornby-Dublo, or the more recent 'Hornby' name purchased by the Triang business in the mid 60s? There's been such a range of mechanisms, it's really necessary to know just what we are looking at, ideally by the catalogue 'R' number that can often be seen on the loco underside. Something I have observed on Triang and Triang-Hornby with dull grey mazak driving wheel tyres, is that it often works better on the old tin plated steel rail track, rather than current nickel silver rail track. (This is very much improved by use of the permanent higher voltage of DCC on nickle silver rail, but that's for later.)

HTH, any questions?
 

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Welcome!

I'm not old enough to remember any of the brands you mention, from personal experience that is.
Apart from a couple of TRIX HO orient express cars from the 1980s, most of my stuff is post-2010.
My only childhood set was a Lima 12v battery set.

As 34C alluded to, your collection sounds a bit like a time capsule. Many folk would be interested in seeing some of your items. So some photos would be nice when you have time.

best regards.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Wow, you really were going back in time! The four definitely extinct brands first.
Did the Graham Farish OO include a loco, or was it just rolling stock? It would be a major triumph getting one of their two pole motored OO locos running well. The rolling stock was OK-ish of its time, but the plastic used has a tendency to embrittlement.
Trix twin ( and the later Trix two rail) loco construction has a reputation of fragility, especially mechanisms, with driven wheels often loose on axles, thus the wobbling.
Mainline locos looked very well, but with a few exceptions, the mechanisms were flaky: split chassis steam loco drives and tender drives, both with weak pancake motors, and a tendency for the plastics in the mechanisms to embrittle and crack even if left unused, resulting in reduced operational life as gears fail or the wheels shift on the plastic muffs in each axle assembly..
Lima, also specialists in pancake motors, and rattly gear trains. But the diesel model power bogies do last well, and provided they get power the motors do rattle the model along. The frequent weaknesses, too few power pick ups, and internal wiring that looks like it was made from random factory floor sweepings. Much improvement is possible by DIY.

'Hornby' covers the largest range of time to present. Is this Hornby-Dublo, or the more recent 'Hornby' name purchased by the Triang business in the mid 60s? There's been such a range of mechanisms, it's really necessary to know just what we are looking at, ideally by the catalogue 'R' number that can often be seen on the loco underside. Something I have observed on Triang and Triang-Hornby with dull grey mazak driving wheel tyres, is that it often works better on the old tin plated steel rail track, rather than current nickel silver rail track. (This is very much improved by use of the permanent higher voltage of DCC on nickle silver rail, but that's for later.)

HTH, any questions?
thanks for that, the farish oo is pretty heavy with a metal body, prairie tank design 2- 6- 2, i acquired it by mistake but it goes ok on the trix twin track. i have some of the early tri-ang track which being deep means that everything i have runs on it, the trouble is that the rail surface has deteriorated and that, it seems, is hard to restore, bit reluctant to use wire wool but maybe there's nothing to lose. i really don't know much about hornby so the last section of your comments is new to me. i have a fair bit of lima track but that suffers the same as the tri-ang except not quite so bad.

it is difficult to know what to do, i'm tempted to sell the trix stuff, i could keep the two rail running locos though. the points are a weak item, irritatingly temperamental. are peco and hornby track are pretty similar please?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welcome!

I'm not old enough to remember any of the brands you mention, from personal experience that is.
Apart from a couple of TRIX HO orient express cars from the 1980s, most of my stuff is post-2010.
My only childhood set was a Lima 12v battery set.

As 34C alluded to, your collection sounds a bit like a time capsule. Many folk would be interested in seeing some of your items. So some photos would be nice when you have time.

best regards.
thanks - i forget how old i am! 72 next year. i still have two (old) motorbikes!! although i hardly use them now. I'm afraid my collection is pretty much tat to be honest, not something to be too proud of, raked it all out of the attic recently. I'd like to get something going so it is a question of picking the best out which, really seems to be lima, I think they closed about 2006. Another make I had as a kid was Wrenn but I don't seem to have kept that - it may have been battery powered.
 

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...early tri-ang track which being deep means that everything i have runs on it, the trouble is that the rail surface has deteriorated and that, it seems, is hard to restore, bit reluctant to use wire wool but maybe there's nothing to lose... i have a fair bit of lima track but that suffers the same as the tri-ang except not quite so bad...
So this is all tin plated steel rail I should think, and is subject to corrosion as there are usually pinholes in the plating, and if it is well used, the tin wears through. From what I have read a minimally abrasive metal polish is the 'life extender' of choice, but I have no personal experience, having abandoned Triang set track in the 1960s.

...are peco and hornby track pretty similar please?
The currently produced standard UK set track is available from Bachmann, Hornby and Peco, and the general consensus is that Peco's version is the best, slightly smaller dead area on the point crossings. All are made with nickel-silver rail.

No idea of your budget or intentions, but there are much better options available in set track systems from HO manufacturers. The UK OO set track design has near stood still since you acquired it, only real update the adoption of nickel silver rail. Far more choice in systems from the likes of Roco, Kato, and many others, but I cannot offer any advice on compatibility, with your Trix and GF items in particular.

Then there are flexible track systems which provide yet better options, if a permanent layout is in your future. It has to be attached to a board, because the track is flexible, won't hold a curve by itself. Peco is the leading brand in the UK. Their code 100 Streamline will enable you to run Lima and most other older models.

thanks - i forget how old i am! 72 next year. i still have two (old) motorbikes!! although i hardly use them now. I'm afraid my collection is pretty much tat to be honest, not something to be too proud of, raked it all out of the attic recently. I'd like to get something going so it is a question of picking the best out which, really seems to be lima, I think they closed about 2006...
If you have your health, age is just a number; and you are a lot braver than I am, haven't gone near a motorbike since turning 25!

In case you are not aware of it, I feel it is worth mentioning there has been a sea change in the design of RTR OO product from about 1995, a torrent of much superior product based on technique developed for HO models, which frankly is so much superior to almost everything previous, that in locos I now only have a few body mouldings which have yet to be replicated from the pre-1995 production, re-equipped with current mechanism designs.

Twin bogie traction for example is now based on a template of a large motor with flywheels, mounted in the centre of a heavy casting, with shaft drive to both bogies, all driven wheels also picking up. Quiet, smooth running, very reliable, pulls side out of house with no need for traction tyres.

As ever, yours to choose once you have seen what is now available.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So this is all tin plated steel rail I should think, and is subject to corrosion as there are usually pinholes in the plating, and if it is well used, the tin wears through. From what I have read a minimally abrasive metal polish is the 'life extender' of choice, but I have no personal experience, having abandoned Triang set track in the 1960s.


The currently produced standard UK set track is available from Bachmann, Hornby and Peco, and the general consensus is that Peco's version is the best, slightly smaller dead area on the point crossings. All are made with nickel-silver rail.

No idea of your budget or intentions, but there are much better options available in set track systems from HO manufacturers. The UK OO set track design has near stood still since you acquired it, only real update the adoption of nickel silver rail. Far more choice in systems from the likes of Roco, Kato, and many others, but I cannot offer any advice on compatibility, with your Trix and GF items in particular.

Then there are flexible track systems which provide yet better options, if a permanent layout is in your future. It has to be attached to a board, because the track is flexible, won't hold a curve by itself. Peco is the leading brand in the UK. Their code 100 Streamline will enable you to run Lima and most other older models.


If you have your health, age is just a number; and you are a lot braver than I am, haven't gone near a motorbike since turning 25!

In case you are not aware of it, I feel it is worth mentioning there has been a sea change in the design of RTR OO product from about 1995, a torrent of much superior product based on technique developed for HO models, which frankly is so much superior to almost everything previous, that in locos I now only have a few body mouldings which have yet to be replicated from the pre-1995 production, re-equipped with current mechanism designs.

Twin bogie traction for example is now based on a template of a large motor with flywheels, mounted in the centre of a heavy casting, with shaft drive to both bogies, all driven wheels also picking up. Quiet, smooth running, very reliable, pulls side out of house with no need for traction tyres.

As ever, yours to choose once you have seen what is now available.
most grateful - thank you :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So this is all tin plated steel rail I should think, and is subject to corrosion as there are usually pinholes in the plating, and if it is well used, the tin wears through. From what I have read a minimally abrasive metal polish is the 'life extender' of choice, but I have no personal experience, having abandoned Triang set track in the 1960s.


The currently produced standard UK set track is available from Bachmann, Hornby and Peco, and the general consensus is that Peco's version is the best, slightly smaller dead area on the point crossings. All are made with nickel-silver rail.

No idea of your budget or intentions, but there are much better options available in set track systems from HO manufacturers. The UK OO set track design has near stood still since you acquired it, only real update the adoption of nickel silver rail. Far more choice in systems from the likes of Roco, Kato, and many others, but I cannot offer any advice on compatibility, with your Trix and GF items in particular.

Then there are flexible track systems which provide yet better options, if a permanent layout is in your future. It has to be attached to a board, because the track is flexible, won't hold a curve by itself. Peco is the leading brand in the UK. Their code 100 Streamline will enable you to run Lima and most other older models.


If you have your health, age is just a number; and you are a lot braver than I am, haven't gone near a motorbike since turning 25!

In case you are not aware of it, I feel it is worth mentioning there has been a sea change in the design of RTR OO product from about 1995, a torrent of much superior product based on technique developed for HO models, which frankly is so much superior to almost everything previous, that in locos I now only have a few body mouldings which have yet to be replicated from the pre-1995 production, re-equipped with current mechanism designs.

Twin bogie traction for example is now based on a template of a large motor with flywheels, mounted in the centre of a heavy casting, with shaft drive to both bogies, all driven wheels also picking up. Quiet, smooth running, very reliable, pulls side out of house with no need for traction tyres.

As ever, yours to choose once you have seen what is now available.
thank you - much appreciated (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So this is all tin plated steel rail I should think, and is subject to corrosion as there are usually pinholes in the plating, and if it is well used, the tin wears through. From what I have read a minimally abrasive metal polish is the 'life extender' of choice, but I have no personal experience, having abandoned Triang set track in the 1960s.


The currently produced standard UK set track is available from Bachmann, Hornby and Peco, and the general consensus is that Peco's version is the best, slightly smaller dead area on the point crossings. All are made with nickel-silver rail.

No idea of your budget or intentions, but there are much better options available in set track systems from HO manufacturers. The UK OO set track design has near stood still since you acquired it, only real update the adoption of nickel silver rail. Far more choice in systems from the likes of Roco, Kato, and many others, but I cannot offer any advice on compatibility, with your Trix and GF items in particular.

Then there are flexible track systems which provide yet better options, if a permanent layout is in your future. It has to be attached to a board, because the track is flexible, won't hold a curve by itself. Peco is the leading brand in the UK. Their code 100 Streamline will enable you to run Lima and most other older models.


If you have your health, age is just a number; and you are a lot braver than I am, haven't gone near a motorbike since turning 25!

In case you are not aware of it, I feel it is worth mentioning there has been a sea change in the design of RTR OO product from about 1995, a torrent of much superior product based on technique developed for HO models, which frankly is so much superior to almost everything previous, that in locos I now only have a few body mouldings which have yet to be replicated from the pre-1995 production, re-equipped with current mechanism designs.

Twin bogie traction for example is now based on a template of a large motor with flywheels, mounted in the centre of a heavy casting, with shaft drive to both bogies, all driven wheels also picking up. Quiet, smooth running, very reliable, pulls side out of house with no need for traction tyres.

As ever, yours to choose once you have seen what is now available.
thanks for reply - very helpful :giggle:
 

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34c is worth listening to, my railway history came from father who started in OO about 1957 and he went Triang but also Dublo when they went over to 2 rail, the follow on Wrenn model wagons are still very excellent and I have about 500 of them, Wrenn used to make in the 60's flexible track that was OO and not the HO standard we use all the time today but it is a mixed bag you have for sure, if you like messing about what you have will do if you want a reliable railway then you will need to start again, Peco 100 will be the best option for you this will keep some of the older stock rolling, as to locos most of us have cleared out similar stock to yours long ago as the modern post about 2005 stuff is very much better whilst most of us use dcc, partly due to the higher voltages but also because of smooth operation with 128 steps.

I value the good track manners of Hornby items as they work now smoothly whilst some others are not so good but the Bachmann 9F is a duzzy The other issue is that most modern locos have tighter clearances which look better but it also means the tightest radius track of R1 at 371 mm radius is only for small tanks and railroad series models, R2 at 432mm radius is about the minimum on set track but streamline is the way to go if you have the space, anyway whatever you do let us know and we will between us get you the most suitable options.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
34c is worth listening to, my railway history came from father who started in OO about 1957 and he went Triang but also Dublo when they went over to 2 rail, the follow on Wrenn model wagons are still very excellent and I have about 500 of them, Wrenn used to make in the 60's flexible track that was OO and not the HO standard we use all the time today but it is a mixed bag you have for sure, if you like messing about what you have will do if you want a reliable railway then you will need to start again, Peco 100 will be the best option for you this will keep some of the older stock rolling, as to locos most of us have cleared out similar stock to yours long ago as the modern post about 2005 stuff is very much better whilst most of us use dcc, partly due to the higher voltages but also because of smooth operation with 128 steps.

I value the good track manners of Hornby items as they work now smoothly whilst some others are not so good but the Bachmann 9F is a duzzy The other issue is that most modern locos have tighter clearances which look better but it also means the tightest radius track of R1 at 371 mm radius is only for small tanks and railroad series models, R2 at 432mm radius is about the minimum on set track but streamline is the way to go if you have the space, anyway whatever you do let us know and we will between us get you the most suitable options.
thanks matey, you end mentioning space, i guess that never seemed an issue all those years ago when, as a kid/teen you might temporarily take over the family living room but those days are gone and the wife isn't keen to see one of the 'children's' bedrooms converted into a hobby area, which is a fair point as they do come home occasionally and expect to see their old bedrooms pretty much how they left them. sorry diverging but perhaps i'd be better off with n gauge if i'm going to start again, funny i came to the same conclusion as you intimate. a bigger layout can be achieved in the same space after all.
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... the wife isn't keen to see one of the 'children's' bedrooms converted into a hobby area, which is a fair point as they do come home occasionally and expect to see their old bedrooms pretty much how they left them...
Two strategies to overcome this:
Move home! No 'children's former bedrooms' in the new location, problem solved.:cool:
Stay put. Demand circa £2K p.a. rent to maintain their bedroom rights. Hopefully at least one of them won't cough up and the room is yours, and any that pay up fund your model railway.:cool::devilish:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
haha - oddly enough a move was contemplated with a particular spot in mind but during these covid yrs and the now widespread working at home thing that area went up in price considerably whereas, for some reason, perhaps the amount of house building in the vicinity, values remained static here, so staying put and spending some of that moving money on the current place. i did think of a shed but with insulation, power and the size i wanted that was coming out too pricey, then there's the garage and attic but they are very much crammed with stuff plus a tad damp. Too soft to take over the kids rooms really so i think it will be demountable n gauge and selling this lot, just put the first installment on eBay.
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Fast man I graduated from a Royal Enfield through this and that ending up with BMW K100 16 valve indeed the Geneva launch bike then I fitted a racing chip, killed the fuel consumption but it did go well even when touring, I said if I survive I'll later buy a Morgan which I did back in 2008.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Fast man I graduated from a Royal Enfield through this and that ending up with BMW K100 16 valve indeed the Geneva launch bike then I fitted a racing chip, killed the fuel consumption but it did go well even when touring, I said if I survive I'll later buy a Morgan which I did back in 2008.
well done matey :)
 
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