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I assume that the photo of St. Laurent in this link to the gallery shows how the paint turns out?

(I tried pasting the photo direct in here, but it's a little on the large size)

David
 

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QUOTE (Brian Considine @ 21 Jun 2008, 12:29) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>That's the one David - although the surface under the paint is Margate beach sand (Clock Tower end - it's finer).

Thanks for posting the link.(Sorry about the file size - I'm pretty useless with a camera !).

Try opening your photo in appropriate software (sounds like paintshop throw) and resize so it is around 150 KB (approx 1000 X 750) (reset the image size and save at 75 dpi). This then loads quite easily to the forum

 

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I do my resizing with Paint because since building this PC, I can't find the software which came with my camera. The current version of Paint (Vista) allows you to resize the image by setting the percentage for horizontal and vertical. Then I save it as a JPG and upload it here. You just have to be careful not to save over your original...


For what it's worth, the photos in my current blog are scaled at 18% in both directions. In other words, you are only seeing 1/36 of what I took.....

David
 

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QUOTE (Brian Considine @ 21 Jun 2008, 13:29) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>That's the one David - although the surface under the paint is Margate beach sand (Clock Tower end - it's finer).

Not only that it tends to be less salty.

Regards
 

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QUOTE (Puzzler @ 21 Jun 2008, 06:58) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Has anyone got any idea's of a good material / paint for making roads? Tarmac etc..
Puzzler..

Scalescenes.com do a reasonable looking tarmac surface that you can download and then print-off and arrange as you like. Also comes with pavements and various road markings and signs. Needs a a flatish surface to stick it too but Woodland scenics smooth-it can create that if needed.

Brian Martin
 

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QUOTE (Puzzler @ 21 Jun 2008, 07:58) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Has anyone got any idea's of a good material / paint for making roads? Tarmac etc..
Puzzler..

In N gauge I find cardboard painted with grey coloured acrylics is more than sufficient;



G.
 

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That is a very convincing photo


David
 

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I use wet and dry paper glued down with a cardboard rib in the middle to give a camber. No painting or added surfacing needed, just look for the right grade and colour to suit the specific location. Cut slightly oversize and Metcalfe pavements sit on top to give a nice kerb effect. Adhesive address labels cut in strips make white lines and pedestrian crossings etc. and although I have never tried it could conceivably be painted yellow before cutting to give those pretty yellow lines that the councils like to decorate the roads with.
 

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QUOTE (ahammond @ 27 Jun 2008, 15:41) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Adhesive address labels cut in strips make white lines

Personally I'm not keen on stuck on paper white lining - especially on a textured surface as they always look/remain proud, never stick down properly and end up with curling lifting corners. It's far better to paint them on (use watercolour acrylics as it's easy to correct errors) like on the real roads.

G.
 

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True they do tend to stand a bit proud, but then so do full size road markings. I get the odd one that will refuse to stick but that is soon fettled with a dab of PVA. Overall the effect is very realistic and a lot less hassle than trying to paint lines accurately by hand.
 

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QUOTE (ahammond @ 28 Jun 2008, 04:47) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>less hassle than trying to paint lines accurately by hand.

I don't actually find it a hassle. Firstly I use a pencil to mark where the lines need to go then simply paint over using a fine brush and thinned acrylic paint. The result looks great with no danger of peeling and curling corners in awkward to reach parts of the layout. And you're able to replicate worn and scuffed lining that you often see on real roads. Plus it's probably easier to paint double yellow tightly curved lines rather than trying to cut and apply such intricate shapes to a consistant width and to remain parallel to the kerb (see photo above and below - although struggling to find good pics of the road markings);





G.
 

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QUOTE (Grahame HHC @ 29 Jun 2008, 19:50) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I don't actually find it a hassle. Firstly I use a pencil to mark where the lines need to go then simply paint over using a fine brush and thinned acrylic paint. The result looks great with no danger of peeling and curling corners in awkward to reach parts of the layout. And you're able to replicate worn and scuffed lining that you often see on real roads. Plus it's probably easier to paint double yellow tightly curved lines rather than trying to cut and apply such intricate shapes to a consistant width and to remain parallel to the kerb (see photo above and below - although struggling to find good pics of the road markings);





G.

Could you tell us more about how you have weathered the lines, and how you have made such a great job of making th eroad looked 'patched'.

Thanks

TimP
 

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QUOTE (TimP @ 29 Jun 2008, 19:21) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Could you tell us more about how you have weathered the lines, and how you have made such a great job of making th eroad looked 'patched'.

The road lines/markings can be made to look worn and distressed by varying the thickness of paint used, over painting, and/or dabbing with semi-absorbant material before completely dry.

The road repair patches are simply painted squares/irregular shapes of other shades/colours of grey. Some have a pencil outlines to represent the tar seal used on some repairs. The road is weathered (exhaust and tyre stains) with a soft pencil gently scribbled on in place then spread and thinned by rubbing with a finger.

G.
 

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QUOTE (Grahame HHC @ 29 Jun 2008, 19:59) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The road lines/markings can be made to look worn and distressed by varying the thickness of paint used, over painting, and/or dabbing with semi-absorbant material before completely dry.

The road repair patches are simply painted squares/irregular shapes of other shades/colours of grey. Some have a pencil outlines to represent the tar seal used on some repairs. The road is weathered (exhaust and tyre stains) with a soft pencil gently scribbled on in place then spread and thinned by rubbing with a finger.

G.

Thanks very much and well done on creating such realistic scenes
 
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