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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Now that I am onto the weathering and modifying the Roco Br44, I wanted to practice first on a cheap Roco Boxcar.

See if its ok. Please critisize, cause any comments will be helpful on the 44.

Before



After





Baykal
 

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Hi Eurkut,

Yes, I could live with that finish
I take it, it was the colors in the traincolor set that gives this effect.
I think a whole layout weathered as good as this, would certainly be something worth seeing

Keep up the good work


David
 

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Nice work Baykal, the weathering has certainly lost the "plastic" look and certainly looks more like a real wagon, more of the same would certainly be effective.

Regards
 

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QUOTE (Brian Considine @ 15 May 2008, 05:53) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>looks like Dave (BRITHO) is going to be busy once he's mastered the job !

I was waiting for that comment..................

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Certainly looks like it has been running around the system in all weathers in the side view. The bufferbeam and buffer stocks could do with the same brake dust and dirt toning as the underframe. You can go on forever 'enhancing' but some evidence of grease and oil on the regularly lubricated moving parts will make a subtle difference. Lots of those effects on a loco!

Something I never thought about until factory weathered vehicles became common was whether to weather non prototype auto couplers. I will weather a buckeye or a three link coupler, but feel that autocouplers of any type are better left black, they seem to 'disappear' rather better in the context of a weathered vehicle.
 

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Dave,

Seems that the CEO of St.Laurent en Ardennes passes a lot of work down to the CDB (Chief Dogs Body) from the creative mussing of the MRF!

John

Need to find a CDB for my Layout
 

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QUOTE (john woodall @ 15 May 2008, 07:48) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Seems that the CEO of St.Laurent en Ardennes passes a lot of work down to the CDB (Chief Dogs Body)

Need to find a CDB for my Layout

Hi John

I'd love to help but I think the commuting would be a problem!

Actually I quite enjoy being CDB of SL - You haven't seen Brians handling of a paintbrush, I have to admit I am not, in my opinion, up to the standards of Baykal yet but I am working on it.

Regards
 

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QUOTE (BRITHO @ 15 May 2008, 08:14) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I have to admit I am not, in my opinion, up to the standards of Baykal yet but I am working on it.

Regards
On your own stock first of course !

Actually (& taking a deep breath, a very deep breath) Dave AKA BRITHO does do a great job & often takes a lot of flak doing it - thanks Dave.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
QUOTE (john woodall @ 15 May 2008, 07:18) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Baykal,

Are you using chalk, pastels or paint?

Cheers

John

Hi John,

I am using the acrylic paints from the "Traincolor" set by Vallejo.
I also have alot of pastel crayons which I simply rub on sandpaper to achive its powder then apply with a flat brush as the final finishing touch.

QUOTE (34C @ 15 May 2008, 07:46) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Certainly looks like it has been running around the system in all weathers in the side view. The bufferbeam and buffer stocks could do with the same brake dust and dirt toning as the underframe. You can go on forever 'enhancing' but some evidence of grease and oil on the regularly lubricated moving parts will make a subtle difference. Lots of those effects on a loco!

Something I never thought about until factory weathered vehicles became common was whether to weather non prototype auto couplers. I will weather a buckeye or a three link coupler, but feel that autocouplers of any type are better left black, they seem to 'disappear' rather better in the context of a weathered vehicle.

34C,

All the rolling stock in the era of the steam was full of muck. Since my loco's are nearly all steamers I wanted to give that effect. Have I overdone a bit?
You can see what I mean by the below photo taken by Hans Peter-Gladtfelt of the Nohab Br56:



and another muck loco



I plan to take this photo of a Class 3406x (Br24) as reference in weathering, also check the backside of the boxcar on the left.



I agree with you on the grease bit on the moving parts. As for the nonprototypical -couplers I also agree with you they all seem to kill all the realism. Nearest to prototypical might be to use Kadee's.

Baykal
 

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Now they are what I call dirty locos - a real challenge for the weathering skills.

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Hi Baykal,

My personal view on weathering is to have it as inconsistant as possible. The odd item heavily weather some litely weathered and most inbetween.

Of course when you have a photo, that makes it so much easier.

What a cool idea, a cow catcher on a class 24.

John
 

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QUOTE (ebaykal @ 15 May 2008, 08:56) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>34C,

All the rolling stock in the era of the steam was full of muck. Since my loco's are nearly all steamers I wanted to give that effect. Have I overdone a bit?
Baykal,

I model circa 1960 British Railways Eastern Region mainline steam, and the same 'overall muck' effect is required on goods engines and freight stock in particular. It is almost impossible to overdo it: as a child at the time I well remember being told (often!) not to run my fingers along railings and similar. They were filthy anywhere near the railway or heavy industry. On this railway big efforts were made to clean the passenger locos and coach sides, and this really made then stand out against the prevailing muck. The next closest mainline railway (London Midland region) never cleaned any loco, and as a child I genuinely thought their locos were brown by intent!
 

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QUOTE (Brian Considine @ 15 May 2008, 08:21) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Actually (& taking a deep breath, a very deep breath) Dave AKA BRITHO does do a great job & often takes a lot of flak doing it



Regards
 

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QUOTE (ebaykal @ 14 May 2008, 22:27) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Now that I am onto the weathering and modifying the Roco Br44, I wanted to practice first on a cheap Roco Boxcar.

See if its ok. Please critisize, cause any comments will be helpful on the 44.

Baykal

***No criticism possible Baykal, you have a good eye for colour and work with pictures for reference which are iportant, and its a very nice weathering job. The positive suggestions I have are:

Texture is at least as important as colour - by all means do much of it with paint but add some powdered chalk/talcum/pastel to the paint around underframes and greasy bits, especially on loco' chassis areas. dab it on while toe paint is wet or mix it into thinned paint and dab it on - use an old or cheap paintbrush though - it wrecks them!!

Texture is lost with cover coats so never add a clear coat over the weathering - it simply kills all the texture differences and makes the job very bland looking.

Get a cheap set of womens eye makeup - the colours are fantastic for weathering and can be great along seams etc - and they provide a good "key" for the powders. It's not only a good weathering material - it amuses me that the same stuff they use to try and look young and fresh makes my models look old and wrinkly too


The super-fine powdered oxides used for ceramic glazes make the best weathering powders by far - they are very strong in colour and are totally colour fast unlike pastels. they are so fine they feel almost greasy and get into the pores of the paint and stick really well with no fixatives at all. If you can buy them as dry powders they may be expensive but several modellers can share them out and make it quite economical.

Mixing these powders into methylated spirits or alcohol also gives a really nice paintable weathering muck that can be brushed on and drys quickly, but is easily played with later with a brush wet with the meths... any pure alcohol works just as well - avoid Arak - too sticky :) :)

Kind regards

Richard
DCCconcepts
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks Richard,

All are noted.
Specially the womens eye makeup.
But might have a bit of problem there with SWAMBO, and going out and buying one...I do not have that courage.


Baykal
 

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Interesting concept using womans eye makeup.

Since I have occassionally used some of SWMBO's kitchen appliances in betterment of my layout building (blenders are such great things) I see I now have a reason to borrow some of my eldest daughters (she is 7 going on 18!) eye shadow for similar purposes. However I can see that the favourite colour (purple or pink) will be safe from me.

However Thomas and Percy could do with a swiss up.

John
 

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Another useful tool from the ladies "tool kit" is of course the make up brush, these are very good for dusting on (or off) fine powders.

Regards
 
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