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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does any one know if it is possible to get:

NJT BR



The Yellow Carriage, not goods, Unsure of name.



Also:

Any of the old steam engines, in the 1930's
 

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QUOTE

Most any steamer from the Bachmann or Hornby range...apart fom BR standard classes....were around,new and old, in the 1930's.

as a rough guide,look for locos in pre-nationalisation liveries, ie LMS, GWR, LNER,SR etc....[ignore the excellent HornbyBulleid 0-6-0...it was a war baby]
 

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Good advice from Alistair. Bulleid Q1 was also a war baby (but can be purchased in Southern Black). We won't even get into the Bulleid Leader discussed in a separate thread!
If you want an interesting prototype for a good variety of steam locos, especially from LMS and SR, you could do worse than look at the Somerset and Dorset. Coaching stock from LMS, SR and LNER were frequently mixed on the line as they travelled from the North to Bournemouth and the South Coast.
 

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Sorry Alistair -

I duplicated your Q1 comment. I meant to add Bulleid West Country/Battle of Britain and Merchant Navy classes, which were also War babies.
 

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Lord C-C, which country are you interested in ? I only ask because your second photo appears to show US Army HEMTT trucks (details here ), in which case you're most likely looking at a US or possibly European prototype wagon. I'm guessing that the 'DODX' branding on the wagon stands for 'Department Of Defense something-or-other'.

I'm not sure what your first photo is but the track and OHL equipment look wrong for the UK as well.

This will, of course, affect the relevance of answers you've had for 1930s steam locos; they're good for the UK but they could be a couple of thousand miles out !
 

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I didn't actually 'get' the second image, so couldn't comment......although the UK equivalent is the old Leyland/DAF MMLC DROPS vehicle in use very effectively with the British Forces world-wide...and much admired by the Americans, simply because there aint no cameras, adn it fits down roads the Oshkosh can't.

Shortly being replaced...[over a l o n g period of time, by MAN's equivalent-but-nothing-like-the-same offering.]....

the plant photo depicts what I think is a modified Caterpiller bulldozer base.....the high drivewheel being the giveaway....doubtless an easy mod as there are loads of platic caterpillas in hO etc...and I beleive there is a website devoted to those who specifically model rail plant, etc..and has been mentioned on this forum....somewhere.....something to do with use of odd bits for wheels, etc????

If a US prototype is modelled, then any of Bachmann's or Athearns or whatever, USRA-prototype steamers would work for the 1930's......in fact, except for wood burners, any available US RTR steamer is good for that era......since by the end of the 1930's, US railroads were wholesale starting to ditch steam in favour of diesel from EMC[D], Baldwin,ALCO, etc.
Of course, if you like wood burners, tehn there was always the Virginia and Truckee RR....which I believe gained a lot of revenue from the film industry??
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE (stuartp @ 29 Nov 2008, 18:50) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Lord C-C, which country are you interested in ? I only ask because your second photo appears to show US Army HEMTT trucks (details here ), in which case you're most likely looking at a US or possibly European prototype wagon. I'm guessing that the 'DODX' branding on the wagon stands for 'Department Of Defense something-or-other'.

I'm not sure what your first photo is but the track and OHL equipment look wrong for the UK as well.

This will, of course, affect the relevance of answers you've had for 1930s steam locos; they're good for the UK but they could be a couple of thousand miles out !

It is mainly a UK line, but the picture is for the flatbed.
 

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QUOTE (stuartp @ 29 Nov 2008, 18:50) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'm guessing that the 'DODX' branding on the wagon stands for 'Department Of Defense something-or-other'.
Indeed it does. The car belongs to the USA Department of Defence which uses them for moving their own equipment around. The 'X' suffix indicates that the car is owned by a non-railroad organisation. Other suffixes used are 'Z' for road trailers registered to be carried by rail and 'U' for containers. This latter is used internationally, look at any British container.
The flatcar shown is an 89' one, commonly used nowadays (since about the 1970's) for normal weight vehicles and containers. There are various varieties of these with either plain decks , guide rails to locate the road wheels and various hitches, usually retractable, in different positions to suit various lengths of trailer. Some also have adjustable mountings for ISO containers. There are also shorter, heavier flats used for heavy equipment.

I cannot locate any models of such DODX flats but when the military has requirements for extensive equipment movements they also use the railroads own fleets of cars. Many of these intermodal flat cars are owned by a pool organisation owned by the major railroads called originally Trailer Train but nowadays trading as 'TTX Company' and using a wide variety of reporting marks containing the letters TT and suffix X to denote the various types of cars. Their cars were originally brown but both Trailer Train and TTX cars have since been yellow
http://chicago.railfan.net/cgi/photos.pl/?page=TTX_cars gives a good explanation of the organisation. TTX have thir own website at www.ttx.com but it is intended mainly for transport professionals and is largely password restricted to registered users.

Several American model companies make models of this type of flatcar. Athearn (Athearn.com) do the slightly earlier 85' cars while Accurail, Atlas and Walthers do several varieties of the 89' cars. The first two have their own ****.com websites but are also shown on the ENORMOUS Walthers site (Walthers.com). Walthers are manufacturers themselves as well as distributors for many other manufacturers but not Athearn who are now owned by Horizon, a rival distributor. All these models are readily available in Britain through dealers who handle American models, most of whom deal direct with Walthers and Horizon.

BTW 1930.s type steam locomotives would not be appropriate for use with this type of equipment. Another poster stated that no new American steam locos were built after the 1930s which is not entirely true. Steaam was built up to and through WW II when wartime regulations restricted the development and building of diesels.The Union Pacific runs two publicity preserved 1940s steamers a 4-8-4 and a 4-6-6-4 "Challenger" which have been used on demonstration modern freight trains. I have a video showing the "Challenger" on a train of double stack containers at speed.

Hope this helps,

Alex. W. Stirrat
 

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Have a look here, the bit of the discussion you want is on page 3.

If you just want something to carry tanks around on, Tri-ang did a green NATO flat wagon years ago which still crops up second hand from time to time but I don't think it was based on a real wagon. Genesis kits do whitemetal/pewter kits for UK Warwells and Warflats, the early versions of which would go with Airfix Shermans or similar tanks. They're pricey though, and not too easy to build according to reviews.

[Edited to take account of Bigboy's rather more informed comments on 89' flats.]
 

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QUOTE (Lord Castellan Creed @ 24 Nov 2008, 17:56) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Does any one know if it is possible to get:

NJT BR



I cna't find a model of this exact vehicle which appears to be an American maintenance of way machine but there are at least two small American manufacturers of similar maintenance machines. Again Walthers have these on their website.

1. Custom Finishing. Walthers manufacturer number 247. They have a wide range which also includes detail parts. Their maintenance vehicles are in their 7000 series part numbers.

2. Durango Press. Walthers manufacturer number 254. A smaller range of maintenance equipment.

As well as their huge web site, Walthers also produce comprehensive paper catalogues, the HO one being the size of a phone book. Most UK specialists who carry American models will have a "shop copy" which they will let you browse. These "reference books" are available to purchase and are issued annually but the last one I purchased in 1999 cost £17.


Bachmann also do some working RTR track maintenance equipment in their European and USA ranges (with or without buffers).

Hope this helps

Alex. W. Stirrat
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
QUOTE (stuartp @ 1 Dec 2008, 18:13) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Have a look here, the bit of the discussion you want is on page 3.

If you just want something to carry tanks around on, Tri-ang did a green NATO flat wagon years ago which still crops up second hand from time to time but I don't think it was based on a real wagon. Genesis kits do whitemetal/pewter kits for UK Warwells and Warflats, the early versions of which would go with Airfix Shermans or similar tanks. They're pricey though, and not too easy to build according to reviews.

[Edited to take account of Bigboy's rather more informed comments on 89' flats.]

I have a lot of tanks at home allready, as before getting into model railways I used to collect WWII models, the carriages are for tanks, and for military containers as there is going to be a military base on my layout.

QUOTE (Bigboy @ 2 Dec 2008, 02:31) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I cna't find a model of this exact vehicle which appears to be an American maintenance of way machine but there are at least two small American manufacturers of similar maintenance machines. Again Walthers have these on their website.

1. Custom Finishing. Walthers manufacturer number 247. They have a wide range which also includes detail parts. Their maintenance vehicles are in their 7000 series part numbers.

2. Durango Press. Walthers manufacturer number 254. A smaller range of maintenance equipment.

As well as their huge web site, Walthers also produce comprehensive paper catalogues, the HO one being the size of a phone book. Most UK specialists who carry American models will have a "shop copy" which they will let you browse. These "reference books" are available to purchase and are issued annually but the last one I purchased in 1999 cost £17.


Bachmann also do some working RTR track maintenance equipment in their European and USA ranges (with or without buffers).

Hope this helps

Alex. W. Stirrat

Thank you for the help, I will be looking on there web-site's when I get home. I only have one model shop near me, and they do not sell ammerican models, although I am modeling mainly england, the layout us suited to most places and can run a variety of engines.
 

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QUOTE I have a lot of tanks at home allready, as before getting into model railways I used to collect WWII models, the carriages are for tanks, and for military containers as there is going to be a military base on my layout.

In that case, google 'Warflat', 'Warwell' and 'Rectank' for suitable British wagons of the period. You might like to have a look at 'Rowlands Castle' in November's Railway Modeller too, it's set in southern England in the run up to D-Day.
 

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QUOTE Rowlands Castle

I took this photo of Rowlands Castle at Warley as I knew there were a lot of members with an interest in military modelling:-



I could do a 1:1 clip of the central tank line up if anyone is interested - what you see above has been reduced by 6 in each dimension i.e. 1/36 original area.

David
 

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A great layout. And the write up continued in the December (current) Railway Modeller.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
QUOTE (stuartp @ 2 Dec 2008, 18:17) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>In that case, google 'Warflat', 'Warwell' and 'Rectank' for suitable British wagons of the period. You might like to have a look at 'Rowlands Castle' in November's Railway Modeller too, it's set in southern England in the run up to D-Day.

do you know any places that it is possible to get previous Railway Modeller magazines?
 
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