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QUOTE (Ruud Boer @ 30 Nov 2014, 19:33) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi bluey,

The damping material is some kind of compressed soft board that is normally used as underlay for a wooden or a laminate floor. When it's laid I'll make some new pictures.

Hi Rudy, Thank you, and yes please, pics would be great
 

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I haven't the room that you have Ruud and at the moment I am trying to sell my house so anything permanent is a no..no!

However, I have bought some tables which give me an area of approx. 2m x 2.5m.

I am laying some of my Profi track in an oval and hoping I may be able to put a terminus in the centre which will be accessed from both sides of the oval. Thus I will have continuous running and also a terminus which I can run in and out of without reversing.

I've yet to determine whether the Profi track will allow me to do this.

I have also just bought some Roco Geoline track as an alternative to the Fleischmann.

I would love to show my efforts on the forum and will see how it progresses.

Please post more photographs of your layout.

Sarah Winfield
 

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RudyB
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219 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Almost did not dare post my first weathering experiences here. But then ... not every story is a success story. My first weathering attempts were not more than that ... an attempt. Oh well ... one has to start somewhere.


Link to some really bad weathering pictures:

On the positive ... I was able to get 48 shades of weathering powder on the cheap: eye shadow from the local supermarket for just €0,79 a box, 12 colors plus 2 foam appliers. But maybe that's one of the iussues ... probably not the right material. However ... it seems it can be used nicely to add some rust or dust spots here and there.

 

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RudyB
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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Today a few more steps have been made. First, the green top layer of 7mm soft board is placed. Pictures follow later this week.

Then a test has been performed with track fixing. I do not like to glue. I like to keep the option open to change the layout, or maybe even start all over again with another layout, at a later time. Not impossible with glue, but still the rail becomes a bit messy. Alternatives could be to use nails, or screws. Yet, I opted for another solution ... the use of metal flower binding wire.

The 1st image shows the fixing wire when it was still green, and therefore visible. After tipping it with a black marker pen it became so well camouflaged that it is almost invisible at normal viewing distances.

More info and more images on the blog via this link.




 

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RudyB
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A couple of important changes have been made to the layout.

First, a few points needed to be moved. They were placed exactly on top of wooden bars under the table, which would have made it impossible to properly install the servo drives.

Second, the connection of the industry tracks has been changed. They were attached to station West main line, which means traffic would have to be interrupted with any shunting operations. The tracks are now connected to station South via a long lead, whch means shunting can take place while (fully automated) main line traffic can simply carry on. A big improvement in play possibilities.

Link to the layout page on the blog.

New situation:


Old situation:
 

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RudyB
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Past Wednesday an order for 21 points and 13 buffers was placed at www.ehattons.com, a UK company. Order processing and shipping from UK to the Netherlands went very smooth &#8230; the package was delivered next day.

I combined the points into the 6 'junctions streets' that I need. With some points it was necessary to remove two outer ends of 2 sleepers in order to be able to connect them. This was easily done using a Dremel, still I wonder why Peco did not design this in?

Then ... yesterday another internet order was delivered from Modeltreinexpress: 2 locs and 2 ESU LokPilot-4 decoders. Of course I tried them out immediately, luckily they seem to work fine.

More info and images on the blog:
- The first track has been laid
- New rolling stock: 2 DCC loco's



 

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RudyB
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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
First of all ... best wishes for a good and healthy 2015 to everyone.

Finally there was time to do some serious track laying. The South loop has gotten its definitive shape, it's ready to be fixed to the table. Also the two East-most points have got their place, including the servo- and frog wire holes drilled in the table.

I must admit that laying flex track is not something that comes easy to me. To make curves (which is 100% the case with this layout
, after bending, the rail has to be pushed or pulled back and forth trough the sleepers. Then bend again ... then push or pull again ... etc. It is quite some 'fumbling'. Also using the Dremel to cut the rails at length can easily go wrong. A few tenths of a mm too short and you have to start all over again. Luckily that has not yet happened and I must say, when done, the end result looks really satisfactory.

For the pushing and pulling I did not like to use pliers just like that. Metal on metal the rail could easily get scratched or damaged. There is a simple solution: I used a piece of rubber of an old bicycle inner tube as a protection layer. This works very nice in 2 ways. It has better friction which makes pulling or pushing easier, and it protects the rail from being damaged.

The blog has a few extra pictures.





 

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RudyB
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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Hi YP. Indeed it's quite impossible to keep joints on a straight. What I do in the curves is to leave the track ends shifted an inch, or 2 inches, which happens automatically when you bend the track, the inner rail becomes 'longer'. That prevents the track from getting a 'kink'. There's a picture of that somewhere on my blog in one of the early posts.

As far as the bending and pulling and pushing is concerned ... I now prepare the track on a separate table. I measure how far the rails have to stick out at the end that I am going to connect. Then pre-bend it on the separate table, push and pull the rails (using )the piece of rubber, which really helps me) as long as I need to get it approximately right.

Then I go to the layout, connect the track, some minor bending to give it it's final shape and then push or pull the rails one last time to have a smooth connection without a gap. This way seems to work reasonably well ... to me that is.

Something else I was considering is to cut the plastic that connects the sleepers (4 by 4) such that you get three pieces of say a foot each. Moving of the sleepers over the rails is much easier per 30 cm in stead of 90. Have not yet tried this out.
 

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RudyB
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219 Posts
Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Interior lighting for €0,32 per wagon? Yes ... it's possible!


Yesterday, at the club (EMV), I worked on interior lighting for my Roco sleep carriage. It's always nice and heart warming to experience how members join in with ideas and with actual help to make it a 'joint project'. A big thanks to Ad, Jan L, Jan R and Jaques.

Around Christmas a local supermarket had strings of 3 foot, battery fed, LED lights on sale for just €0,95 (!). I wondered if it would be possible to use these for interior lighting of coaches. I took the plunge for a 'depth investment' and bought 2. That should be enough length for the 6 coaches I have. If it would not work out, the damage would be just €`,90 ... I would survive


It worked well to build the led's inside the coach wagon. Electrical wires are coming out, which will connect to the next wagon. Today I did the second wagon ... that one works well now too.

The third wagon, to complete one train of 3, is still to do. That one is more complicated, there are 3 extra's:
1. The batteries have to be mounted into this one.
2. I like to have 2 red LED's as tail liaghts
3. A reed switch and a small metal plate need to be assembled inside, such that it is possible to switch the lights on/off with a small magnet on the outside.

More info and more images on the blog.







 

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Ruud, I love the idea of the discounted Christmas lights, and the magnet/relay switch is another great idea. Have just obtained some cheap Christmas lights, and your method, including the magnet/reed-relay switch, will be copied.

Cheers
Mike
 

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Have to see how you get on with splicing track on a bend, I would also only cut square and join across equally, by this I mean keep the track cut aligned with the sleepers but a sharp bend with this connection is not good at all.
 

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RudyB
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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
@Mike.
Haha, that's nice, that you could still get the lghts! Curious to see your results as soon as there is something to show Mike.

I started working on coach #3 today. The reed switch probably can be made to work ... did some manual tests and it switched well. The trouble I face is that the reed has to be mounted in the same area as the 2 tail light led's. I'll have to figure out how to place the reed, 2 led's , 2 resistors and some wiring in a cramped area without making any electrical shorts. I did not have the correct R value, further work is postponed till end of next week.
 

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QUOTE (kristopher1805 @ 9 Jan 2015, 18:05) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Have to see how you get on with splicing track on a bend, I would also only cut square and join across equally, by this I mean keep the track cut aligned with the sleepers but a sharp bend with this connection is not good at all.
You know what Christopher?, Yesterday I went on the internet and unlike Jeremy Clarkson I found this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKPB_-eFLEw...ORw&index=2
 

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RudyB
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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
@kristopher

On this blog post there's a pcture that shows how the track is connected in a curve.
http://rudysmodelrailway.wordpress.com/201...t-oval-is-laid/

Here's a youtube movie on this. Normally when a 3 feet track is bent, the inner rail already sticks out an inch, so what is shown in the video happens almost by itself, no need to cut off a piece of rail.
 

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RudyB
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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Station South and its surrounding loop is laid. 13 junctions have got their exact coordinates and the track in between is accurately cut to length using a Dremel and is connected. Time for a test drive!

The track is not yet fixed to the table. I'm not even sure if I'm going to do that. It seems that when the junctions are fixed, which is needed because the servo's execute a sideways force on them, the track in between stays put all by itself. Here and there the track is slightly lifted, apparently there's some tension on. It has to be flattened to the table at those points. But the rest ... I'll first see how it goes with a minimum of fixation points, it's always possible to add more later.

Here's a video of the first test drive.



 
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