Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1974 Hornby Silver Seal Evening Star, Tender Driven. Got it second hand, initially it worked fine, then the loco wheels / valve gear kept stopping. Tried a light lube at all joints and just seem to have made the problem worse.
Any suggestions please?
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
7,683 Posts
Brian,

Not an uncommon feature of this loco. The usual problem: handling of the chassis can easily result in one or both connecting rods receiving a little bend inward toward the wheels. It doesn't need much and they can then catch on the second axle crankpin. Other foulings of rods are possible, but this is the most common. The nest time it stops make a careful inspection before handling the loco. Gently bending the rods so that they all miss each other at all rotational positions and side to side displacements of the wheels is the cure.

Less optomistically, if the loco has been run a great deal there may be significant wear in a number of locations. The coupling rod holes on the crankpins may have worn sloppy enough that one or more can slip partway over a screw head and lock on for example, or even comes right off the crankpin screw. If a penetrating lubricant has been used on the chassis the insulating bushes in the wheels one side can deteriorate, and the wheels go out quarter. But these are less likely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the quick reply.

Seemed to make things more difficult to diagnose as it was locking enough to stop the wheels under the loco's own weight, but would turn as soon as touched.
Given everything a check over, the centre sections of the connecting rods both had a bend, bent out in the centre. Took the conrods off all together and the wheels still were not keen on rotating. Made sure there was no excess oil on the axles, eased the pressure on the pickups, straighten the rods and reassembled.
Was better but not perfect, seemed to run better backwards. Half an hour running forwards with another loco on the front towing, has seemed to now greatly improved things.
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
7,683 Posts
Good move taking all the rods off and seeing that the wheels were not freely rotating on their own. I didn't even think about that possibility as this is normally a very free running unit, with a pair of chunky brass collars as bearings on all five axles. Did you actually remove the keeper plate and take the wheelsets out of the chassis? There could be any (or all!) of dried on lubricant residues, fluff, or dirt, causing friction on the axles and bearings. If that's the problem then a thorough clean up followed by a little light oil should improve matters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, took the keeper off. A couple of the axles had some old hair on them, so cleaned them, wiped and re-oiled the axles, taking dirty oil off them.
Its not running perfect, but much much better. Will run it for a while now and see how it goes.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top