Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
This lockdown malarkey has caused so many problems for families trying to make ends meet but for someone like me, now 70, the only change is not being able to go down the pub and not having to leave my house to attend meetings (goodness how i have come to detest Zoom). I know how lucky I am especially when I read how many poor souls have lost their lives.

You know where I am going with this because you've read the title of this post. I am spending some of this enforced time at home scanning my slides and negatives, something I have been threatening to do for years. I have already posted two or three scans on other topics but i thought that it would be nice to upload the odd photo in one place as I progress through my back catalogue ..... as it were. No chronological order because as I unearth yet another slide magazine from boxes stored in the garage I am putting a selection through the scanner so it's a bit pot luck.

I will start with this:


Stuttgart Hbf - 02/08/1986 at 07:21 110 184-9 hauling empty stock into the station.

It was early on a Saturday morning and we had arrived on the overnight train from Ostende. We (being my wife and daughter plus me) lived in Cambridge at that time and had travelled down to London Victoria to catch the midday boat train connecting with the Dover - Ostende ferry service. Dover marine station was still in use and it was a short walk from the train onto the boat (or should that be ship). I was enjoying my early morning photographic opportunity as we waited for the 08:11 departure for Tubingen where we would spend a fortnight with my wife's parents.

For the technically minded the camera I was using at that time was a Contax 159MM and in this instance the film was AgfaChrome 100. As can be seen with the photo of 110 184-9 I had set the hyperfocal distance about 20' behind the front of the loco so the number is a bit blurred. Zeiss lenses were good but in use they were only as good as the idiot holding the camera.

The scanner is an Epson V600 using Epson scanning software and I'm adjusting the images where necessary with the basic image editing tools that come with Windows 10. Perhaps I could get a better result with more advanced software but to be honest, I'm not really a very advanced sort of chap so this will have to do.

So .......... onwards and upwards.

Best regards ................ Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
As I was writing that last post I was thinking, "did i take a photo of that train for Tubingen?" Of course I did.


Stuttgart Hbf 02/08/1986 at 07:45. 111 065-9 waits to depart for Tubingen. The train comprises a full rake of Silver Fish coaches with a driving trailer at the rear. This train was hauled to Tubingen and pushed to Stuttgart.

Happy days now nigh on 34 years ago.

Best regards ................. Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Thank you David and Richard. I will try not to disappoint.

Working my way through this current slide magazine I realise that I have the chance to illustrate the way DB operated services in this area. My last post had my family waiting at Stuttgart for our connecting service to Tubingen which was hauled by a Class 111. My next photo was taken at Tubingen 2 days later - Monday lunchtime. I had obviously managed to escape the in-laws for a couple of beers at the bahnhof.


Tubingen Hbf 04/08/1986 with the 13:34 departure for Stuttgart which it will push. Notice the blinds are drawn down to keep the cab cool. The blinds were also down on the other cab which faced the connecting carriage.


This is the other end of the train with a Silberlingen (silverfish) driving trailer leading. They always orientated this service with the loco at the Tubingen end. The orange livery was gradually fazed out as the coaches were painted in the Epoch IV turquoise and cream livery. If only I had checked the refurbishment dates which were imprinted on the solebar. Too late now.

Before I finish this post perhaps a photo of a diesel locomotive might balance things up a bit.


Tubingen Hbf 04/08/1986. 13:15 and 215 075-3 departs from Gleis 3 for Sigmaringen. Class 215's were active here for years on these services so this is typical for the 1970's through to the early 1990's.

The Class 215 originally were outshopped in the DB red livery and this train for Sigmaringen would have consisted of a red 215 with a rake of green carriages. I know that somewhere I have a photo of such a rake because DB operated a Summer service over the Tubingen - Sigmaringen route which was very popular with families and walkers. I think I photographed this in 1988 if my memory can be relied upon (says he bravely). I will post it when i find it.

Best regards ............ Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
In that last post i mentioned my memory and as I put down all these facts and figures I don't want you all to imagine that I'm some sort of "Menzo the memory man". I of course kept notes and i have my notebooks with me still.



This is a scan of the relevant pages for 04/08/1986. You will notice that there are two suspicious gaps in the timings where I would have been repairing to the bahnhof buffet for much needed refreshment.


Notebooks documenting a railway life. My preferred notebook was produced by Jarrolds of Norwich. Sadly they don't make them anymore.

Nuff said.

Best regards ................... Greyvoices (alias anorak)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
I wonder if there is a scanning complaint such as "scanner's elbow" because if there is then I will be sure to get it. If the scanner was a steam engine I would be going around it with an oil can after I complete each magazine of 50 slides.

Now that I have started this topic I have come to realise just what I have taken on. I have thousands of slides and negative film which document my travels and working life across about 20 countries. My main interest is Germany but looking at the UK I have goodness knows how many images. Scanning what comes up in any order will make this a very random topic so I am tempted to start different topics for each country. Is there enough interest in my amateur snaps or am I deluding myself that such a course of action would be appreciated by enough people to make it worthwhile?

I also have choices as to how deep i go into the collection in any one location. I have finished scanning the Tubingen/ Schwabian area in 1986 and am currently scanning Trier in 1988. Should I jump backwards and forwards?

In the meantime:


Stuttgart Hbf 02/08/1986. 06:51. 103 127-7 with the 07:08 departure for Hamburg.

I like this photo not just because it is a Class 103 in the Epoch 4 livery but it represents InterCity travel in West Germany prior to the wall coming down and of course pre-ICE. The Class 103 was never quite the same once it was demoted to IR trains and painted in one or other of those awful all over red liveries post 1990 ........... like below:



Class 103 approaching Duisburg in 1999 with possibly not the worst of the later all over red liveries.

Well what do you think?

Best regards ............. Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Encouragement and comments really do make this all worthwhile so thank you all ........... Babs, Alan, Bear and David. I decided that there are just too many images covering so may areas and subjects that it would be best if I opened up another topic for British Railways scan: HERE

I was thinking of continuing chronologically but I scanned in some images from Trier in 1988 and I couldn't resist posting. Would you believe that I completely forgot that I had taken these and have not looked at them for the best part of 25 years.


Trier Hbf 04/04/1988 - 17:40 late afternoon. 184 001-6 Gleis 11 with a train for Thionville (France)

The Class 184 had been built in 1966 as a prototype "Europa Locomotive" capable of working on 4 voltages, 1500V & 3000V dc and 15kV & 25kV ac. The achilleas heel of this idea was the variety of signal systems adopted by different countries and railway authorities. This early attempt at interoperability was doomed from the start so the 184's were subsequently paired back to dual voltage and restricted to operations between Trier, Luxembourg and onwards into France as far as Thionville. This area is a steel making concentration so the 184 was perfect for cross border freight movements of coal and ore:


Trier Hbf 04/04/1988 at 17:55. 184 002-4 with a northbound coal wagon empties working.

Followed 5 minutes later by the opposite working:


Trier Hbf 04/04/1988 at 18:00. 215 034-0 with southbound coal train.

To be honest that looks like one helluva load for a Class 215 and I'm wondering now if I have confused north with south or full and empty but I am just reading from the notes I took at the time. I need to revisit Trier Hbf armed with a compass and a map.



As can be seen from the notebook there were some very interesting movements all in the space of an hour and this on Easter Monday. I had been a dutiful husband/father/son-in-law for a few days so my family let me out on my own.


Trier Hbf 04/04/1988 at 17:34. 181 205-6 for Saarbrucken and 181 202-3 for Luxembourg.


Trier Hbf 04/04/1988 at 18:21. 181 224-7 with a Luxembourg to Koblenz working which I boarded here.

The Class 181 was a much more successful multi-system design and worked extensively between Germany. France and Luxembourg and could be seen as far "inland" as Frankfurt and Stuttgart. Class 181's lasted well into this century and I bumped into 181 224 once again in April 2007, still on IC service late in the evening at Frankfurt Hbf.


Frankfurt Hbf April 2007. 181 224-7 at that time in that awful DB red with white bib. I much prefer the original electric passenger blue livery and even the turquoise and blue is preferable in my eyes. At this time 181 224 must have been 39 years old. Obviously this is a digital image which made photos such as this so much easier to take.

Best regards ................. Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Freight through Plochingen 11/08/1986

Yes I have jumped back in time to the summer of 1986. That was a memorable fortnight's holiday with my wife's family as I had not up to then explored this region of Germany. No that's not strictly true as I had first visited Tubingen with my wife to be just as the last Prussian P38 class of steam locomotive (designated as Class 38 by DB and DR) was disappearing from local services. Sadly I was not then a photographer. 1986 was the year that I finally adopted the slide format. I managed quite a few odd hours of escape to look at the railways around Tubingen and a short trip to the Stuttgart <> Ulm mainline at Plochingen proved to be most rewarding. Monday 11/08/1986 was a glorious sunny day in that part of the world as the first couple of photographs show:


150 153-5 with a southbound train of 4 axle tank wagons passes through Plochingen Hbf at 15:20 11/08/1986.


260 510-3 shunts a Res wagon loaded with a cement lorry. This had been driven onto the wagon from the loading bank. I then watched as the short formation was shunted backwards and forwards right across the mainline to the hump shunt incline on the opposite side. Only a year or so later DB redesignated shunting locomotives in the 300 series number scheme and this loco became 360 510-2, allocated to Tubingen.


To help you get your bearings I have copied this map from the DB Interctive Infrastructure mapping website

Plochingen is situated just to the south of Stuttgart on the mainline to Ulm which passes over the Geislingen Steige; a formidable barrier to heavy train movements. The route to Tubingen branches from the mainline here. I was particularly interested in freight movements through plochingen because I had read that the DB Class 194 ELoks were still hauling trains beteen Stuutgart Kornwestheim yard and Munchen. Whn I enquired of one of the station staff when a 194 would be passing through he told me that they never appeared on a Monday. Typical ........... so I plotted on the train back to Tubingen how I could wangle another trip to Plochingen without the family feeling neglected. Their was a lot of thinking time as my train home was an all stopper hauled by a Class 140; nominally a freight locomotive but they were often employed on lesser duty passenger workings in this area of Baden-Württemberg (oh yes an umlaut).

Best regards ............. Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Freight through Plochingen 12/08/1986

The next day proved to be very wet but my plotting on the train back to Tübingen did prove successful as I managed to sell Plochingen as a place for a family visit in inclement weather. There was an art exhibition that just had to be seen. Whilst the family gazed at paintings I dodged the rain to record those much desired images of Class 194 locomotives.


194 042-8, one of the original build started in 1940, passing southbound though Plochingen Hbf with a train of Eaos wagons.


Another venerable Elok, 194 055-0 battling through the rain with a mixed northbound freight at 13:54.


It's now 14:20 as 194 138-4 passes southbound with yet another mixed freight.


A variety of traction was used on freight workings and here we see a northbound freight hauled by 151 141-9.


And here was a northbound short freight hauled effortlessly by 150 171-7 notable as it retains its original green livery. 14:22

All in all a good day despite the bad weather. I even gained brownie points for suggesting the art exhibition because it was apparently very good. Happy days.

Best regards ................. Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Hi there John and Reddo it's good to see you both active on the forum and I appreciate your comments on this thread. Your comment about separating out other photos Reddo is catered for here: Scans of my British Railway life

In honour of Reddo's Munchen connection and John's interest in the E94 I dug out this photo:


Munich Donnersbergerbrücke 05/04/88 at 07:15 - 194 149-9 stands outside Bahnbetriebswerk München Hbf

This was a memorable day for me as I arrived in Munich at 06:25 after sleeping in a couchette coach (Liegewagen) having caught this overnight service (Amsterdam > Wien) at Koblenz the night before at 21:45. I did that a lot, a day travelling and sleeping in overnight trains; planning my route through stations that provided showers. I know that some chaps can be content with an APC in the cramped onboard toilet but I liked to feel fresher than that. (APC stands for armpits and crutch - probably said to much there). When I say that I did that a lot I mean over the years for in any one year I could only get away to Germany once or twice and sometimes three times. Later, after British Rail was privatised I graduated (if that is the right word) to working across Europe but mainly based in Germany, Switzerland or Belgium. Travel by train through Germany then became a weekly occurrence. I was damned lucky and I know it. I am thankful that I had the opportunity to have a railway career.

Anyway .......... This was the day after I was in Trier and I was targeting a visit to Bahnbetriebswerk München Hbf so a short S/bahn ride to Donnersbergerbrücke, over the bridge and along the footpath to the depot ....... and there it was 194 149-9. The light was not ideal but I am quite pleased with the photo. For those interested in such stuff it was shot with a Contax 159 MM camera fitted with a 50mm F1.4 Zeiss lens on Kodachrome 64 film.

The depot interior was somewhat cramped for photography but I did manage this:



and this:



and this:



I will save the other photos of the depot for another post. As you can see this was a very good start that day and looking at the photos I am transported back in my memory.

Best regards ................ Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thank you David. Would it be possible to rename this topic "Scans of my German Railway life" ...... because that is what it has become. Your help would be appreciated.

I know that you like cross border working and the OBB <> DB workings are probably of some interest so here is an example:


München Hbf 02/04/1988 - 08:13. 1044 007-1 arrival. In my opinion this is a fine looking locomotive.

I have seen an OBB Class 1044 as far north as Frankfurt and it would be interesting to know just how far they penetrated before such services were taken over by ICE units.

Best regards .............. Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Yes John, Epoch IV in southern Germany were certainly interesting times. My scans will very soon bring to life some of what I observed to the north but first I thought I would stray towards the Bodensee (Lake Constance). More specifically Lindau where three railways met, OBB, SBB and DB. This will also give me a chance to redress the ELok bias that hitherto has been evident in this topic.

Lindau is basically an island reached by a causeway. Once famous for the presence of both Bavarian and Baden-Württemberg pacific steam locomotives which, with the merger of state railways into Deutsche Reichsbahn in 1920 gradually became variations of Class 18. By the time I came along in the 1980's (Epoch IV) Lindau was served by non-electrified routes in Germany but the line through to Bregenz in Austria and thence to Switzerland was electrified ......... so this was a place for DB DLoks plus OBB & SBB ELoks.


Lindau Hbf 02/04/1988 at 13:03. 218 436-4 maneuvers from the depot, onto the causeway to then set back onto a train in the station.
For those interested in the technicalities of photography I see that I noted that I shot this with my Cpntax 159MM fitted with a 35mm Zeiss lens - aperture of f3.5 and speed of 1000. Kodachrome 64.




Lindau Depot is shown on the above Stadtplan as the kickback siding right at the bottom of the island. The depot, seen here again on the 02/04/1988 hosts diesel shunter 332 221-1 with a few Class 218 beyond.


Lindau Depot. A further view on the same day with a range of Class 218.

Goodness me, a post with no ELoks.

Best regards ............. Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
So Lindau is still a place of interest David. My wife and I once toured by car (shame on me) the circumference of the Bodensee and stayed at Lindau for, I think 4 nights. Lindau is indeed in Bavaria as the hotel staff were very proud to point out. The dinner time delicacy that took my fancy was a Pflaumenknödel (plum dumpling) which was claimed to be of Bavarian culinary origin. Shades of Mandy Rice Davies thought I but regardless of its Bavarian uniqueness it did taste good.


Yes David .......... the famous lighthouse.



Back to ELoks. Lindau Hbf 02/04/1988 and SBB Re 4/4 11196 arrives with a train from Zurich.



OBB Class 1110 number 519-4 backs onto SBB stock. Just why an Austrian loco was scheduled to haul a Swiss train I did not at the time attempt to fathom out.

I read from my 1989 published OBB Platform 5 book that 1110 519-4 was based at Bludenz ostensibly for working mountainous lines.


Yest more questions. OBB Class 1044 locos, the train consist being 1044 087-3 + 1 coach + 1044 101-2 + 5 coaches.

I presume that this train splits somewhere en route but I have to admit that I did not try to understand what was going on.


Finally, back to the depot for a final look.

I have included this photo because it gives me the chance to mention the perils that can beset a railway photographer. In the photo you can see the red benches that line the lakeside walk that separates the depot from the water. I was standing on the back of one of those benches, bracing my mid-riff on the top of the fence which was chain link heavily grown over by a sharp and prickly hedge. Yes, read it and weep. I became hopelessly stuck and with one hand holding my precious camera I was finding it impossible to extricate myself. I think by this point I was standing on one leg and fast losing the battle when a middle aged German couple kindly offered their help. I handed over the camera and managed to untangle myself with both hands now free. Once on the ground and re-united with my camera I thanked them profusely and I have wondered since what they made of that odd Englishman they bumped into whilst holidaying in Lindau. How many times might they have told this story at dinner parties.

On that note ...............

Best regards ............... Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Thank you Alan ............ there will be some steam locomotives as we progress through the slides. I am resisting the urge to jump ahead of myself but we will eventually arrive at some dampf aktion.

Forgive me for going back on myself but I came across another slide of the Class 194 outside Munich BW. I remembered taking a second shot which included a passing Class 103. A bit blurry but I liked it because it reminded me of a Turner painting but this time it was not the old timer that was faded:


194 145-9. 05/04/1988 Bahnbetriebswerk München Hbf being passed by 103 147-5

Sometimes a photograph can be technically imperfect yet still be of interest .............. to me anyway.

Best regards ................. Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Thank you Bear and Julian for your comments.

On the clock issue I have to say that in the 194 + 103 photograph the building to which you refer is not exactly a signal box; I believe that it is more a depot yard control centre. I of course stand ready to be corrected but the clock is therefore a yard clock which i don't think is that uncommon. I will of course keep my eye open for signal boxes equipped with publicly viewable clocks as we progress through my collection.

Now what about that strange yellow and black chevron ground signal? I have 5 books devoted to German railway signalling and not one of them provided any explanation or had an illustration that might be of use. Eyes weary from gazing at endless book illustrations I sat in my garden trying to forget all about it, cool glass in hand and enjoying hearing about the exploits of one Stuart Broad on my headphones ............... but then I suddenly thought, "I've seen a signal similar to that on another slide I have scanned". So, rushed upstairs to my study and cursering through my most recent scans and there it was:


Braunschweig Hauptbahnhof 06/04/1988 at 10:03. 634 627-4 waits to depart for Hameln flanked by battery unit 515 528-8.

Notice that yellow and black chevron "signal" now raised high on a post. I think the clue is in its location. It is obviously located in the middle of a long platform that is operationally split so that it can be occupied by two trains within the same block section. I think that it is what I think of as a "permissive signal" which can be passed if the road ahead is not occupied. What do you think Bear?

This theory also works in the Munich depot photo as a loco can arrive but can only proceed with caution if the road ahead is clear ............ or ........... might be subject to local rule variations which rely on the driver doing something at that location which is defined by the chevron ............... maybe stop and wait for instructions?

I will keep my eyes open for any ther possibilities or illustrations.

Best regards .............. Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
I have now found this: An overview of shunting signal SH 0 & SH 1. David's explanation intrigued me.

This is a website devoted to German signalling matters and the above link takes you to the relevant page where, if you pan down a ways you will eventually come across the explanation of why the backside of these signals are painted as yellow and black chevrons. The Google translation says, "Low light blocking signals pose a first-class stumbling hazard for shunter and all other railway workers who walk around in the track area. That's why these “dwarfs” were given a hazard warning on the back".

There must be some very tall railway staff in Braunschweig.

Click on this link to access the DB leaflet that explains it all.

Signalling is indeed a very complex beast.

Best regards ................ Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Turning back to my scanned slides and for the moment resisting the urge to post more Bahnbetriebswerk München Hbf I thought that it might be of interest if I posted this:


Landshut 05/04/1988 at 09:24. 194 192-1 plus 194 193-9 sit on the depot.

After leaving the Munich depot I retraced my steps back to the Hauptbahnhof where I caught the 08:38 departure for Regensburg (hauled by 111 071-7); the route being via Landshut. I took this photo from my train window as we passed the depot so it is what it is. My notes have it that there were 7 locomotives present around the depot but the only other number that I logged was 194 184-8 (such an anorak). I have been through Landshut since 1988 but only at night so could not compare more recent activity and the types of locomotive that have replaced this obvious stronghold of the Class 194.

My thoughts turn to Google Maps and the excellent satellite views that are available. I don't know how current the image Google image is but it does show a compliment of, once again 7 locomotives. I suspect these to be predominantly Class 152 but I am always open to be corrected by those with more knowledge.


Google Maps satelite image of Bw Landshut.

Best regards .................. Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Your comments are always worth reading Bear. The general principle of the driver being the final arbiter of safe movement is common across all the railway administrations that I have worked with.

Back to clocks ..................


Frankfurt Hbf - more specifically - Stellwerk Frankfurt-Hauptbahnhof - 17/8/89 and 365 720-2 rests between station pilot movements.

Now that is a signal box clock.

Best regards ................. Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Exactly Bear .............. I don't think that DB consulted British Railway architects for the design of that signal box.

Now for something completely different

I have noticed a tendency of this topic to concentrate on electric locomotives. Whatever the reason for that I thought it might be interesting to occasionally redress the balance so here are a few studies of diesels ............ red ones ........... the proper original red livery.


Tübingen Hauptbahnhof 18/07/1990 at 18:05. 211 286-0 runs through the station en route to the depot.


Tübingen Hauptbahnhof 18/07/1990 at 18:08. 215 139-7 backs onto a train of Silberlingen coaches to become a service to Sigmaringen.


Tübingen Hauptbahnhof 04/08/1986 at 13:55. A view of Gleis 12 occupied by a three car Uerdingen railbus (German: Uerdinger Schienenbus) flanked by 333 011-5.


Tübingen Hauptbahnhof 04/08/1986 at 13:15. This diesel shunter was employed as carriage pilot. Another view of 333 011-5.
Notice that the Silberlingen is painted turquoise at the sole bar level which was a paint scheme adopted in Epoch IV. (Hopefully someone can contribute the correct cut off date). The Epoch III sole bar (for want of a better word) livery was black.

A quick note on the use of the word Gleis

The word Gleis refers to a track number not the platform. This can be confusing at a station like Tübingen which does not have 12 platforms. It gets worse because in Plochingen (the junction station on the Stuttgart <> Ulm mainline where the Tübingen branch diverges) you can board a train at Gleis 55 ......... although in some larger stations a consecutive platform numbering system has been adopted. Perhaps we can explore this in a later post but .......... not just now.

Best regards ............... Greyvoices (alias John)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
The photo of the Class 211 in Tübingen set me thinking as I had just scanned in a photo of a Class 212 and i noticed the build variations. So ................


Freight sidings adjacent to Bahnbetriebswerk Hamburg-Eidelstedt - 08/04/1988 and 212 043-4 is at the head of a short trip freight.

This is what can be described as the other end of the loco, the non-radiator end.


Plochingen 11/08/86. The other end - 212 247-1 maneuvering around the freight sidings.

The 211 and 212 classes were, to my eye indistinguishable as the difference was in the uprating of the 212 to 1,350 hp - the 211 was rated at
1,100 hp. The alphabet soup of the engine designation is of countdown conundrum tediocity and I will leave you to look it up if you are that bored with life.

Best regards ................... Greyvoices (alias John)
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top