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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have used a well know incline set on my layout, onto which I have secured a cork underlay. When laying the track onto the cork, do people glue the track and then ballast, or simply rely on the ballast to secure the track

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The adhesive used to secure the ballast will hold the track in place. But you want your carefully aligned track formation to be maintained during the process of arranging the ballast and applying the adhesive. Many ways of skinning this particular cat, I now favour double side adhesive tape, but have successfully used 3M Spraymount in the past because I got several part used cans free from a friend shutting down his art business before going off to Oz.
 

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I use white wood glue to attach the track to the cork underlay. I put a dab of it at each end of about every fifth sleeper on straight track but more frequently on curves. The track is then held down with food cans while it sets. One reason for doing this is that I sometimes don't ballast for months after track laying. It makes the track fairly easy to remove, if necessary, with a paint scraper (or other thin blade) slid carefully along underneath it.
 

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I use Copydex as you can get the track back up again and remove the glue.

David.
 
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Always a good idea to seal the cork first (I usually use a brown household imulsion paint), then glue track down, then apply the ballast with a 'watered' down PVA-type mix.

If you lay the track and rely on the ballast to hold it, it only takes one or two ballast stones to get under sleepers and the railhead level is quickly all over the place.

Speaking of railhead levels, this is how I check mine: Using a Mirror to Align Track - Model Railways On-Line
 

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Having revisited to see the range of methods suggested (just in case one falls into the category 'ah, worth trying', whereas all my model railway technique is 'shamelessly copied from others') a thought occurred.

I have never (yet) ballasted track on a deliberate incline. Are there any particular problems associated with ballasting on an incline, and if so at what gradient do problems begin to occur?
 

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I have had no problems on 1 in 48.

David
 
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To go back to your original question I would first ask how large your railway is going to be, a shunting plank OK you can glue but as the layout expands this gets more difficult. Complex junctions demand set up accuracy and glue but then get it wrong is an issue, if you need to adjust for some reason then the glue becomes a nuisance and ballasting never looks as good again.

You might easily find a point problem such as a spring failure or you want to go electrofrog it all just gets messy, the alternative is to go track pin, now these come in all sorts of sizes so I use an intermediate size and never the Peco easy bend, so my track sits on Noch-Guagemaster gritted underlay and I pin sparingly, the only issue I get is that as trains run along they depress the track a little and over time pins can work loose so it takes a tap to get them home again.

Then again I do have complicated track work and if needed I can shuffle it to get better curves fit extra features etc.

I am certainly pleased with the look here although to achieve the 1962 'look' I am now ballasting between the track ballast, anyway this is a complicated junction and it slowly being switched to electrofrog without any detriment to the look.

 

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At 2.4 x 1.1M, that layout is going to have some seriously sharp curves and steep gradients! With that highly restricted space, I'd be re-instating my 009 stock. I certainly wouldn't be trying to create a roundy-roundy in OO/HO.

Please glue track down - it always looks infinitely better than having massive, unrealistic looking tree trunks (pins/screws) penetrating sleepers. For all those who insist on pins and argue that it allows things to be adjusted, there's no reason why pins can't be butted against the end of sleepers to hold/adjust things while glue dries. The pins are removed afterwards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
LOL - the gradients are OK, but yes there are a couple of R1 curves. I have deliberately kept my rolling stock is small DB/DR locos and carriages, and they seem to cope OK. I had an n gauge layout but had to get rid of that due to rubbish eyes !!

I am using some very small Fleischmann screws (I think they were for my old n-gauge) and they work well and are covered by the ballast
 

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Devon Alex my layout is 4m x 5.4m so I have reasonable space, meanwhile Graham is rather prejudice about pinning and no you cannot see any on my photos above in fact I have trouble finding them when I want to relay or adjust, add something etc and rely on running my finger over the track to find them, I have no problem either way simply I found the system of pins easier when things need changing
In the meantime good luck, you are certainly ambitious in the space you have.
 
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