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Just before Christmas I bought a LMS Flatiron 2000 class tank loco by wills running on a Triang chassis. I set the loco up on my rolling road and turned my DC controller to about 50% and stood back pleasantly surprised by the response of the chassis. I then sat down to work on painting one of my townstreet models while the tank loco was running on the rolling road. A few minutes later a strong smell of burning caught my attention. I looked at the flatiron and was amazed to see bright orange flames coming out of the firebox! Triang were clearly miles ahead of their time....certainly beats DCC firebox glow!

I quickly cut the power and blew out the flames. I then removed the loco body (which thankfully wasn't damaged at all....can you imagine what the results would be if this happened to a modern loco!!!) and everything looked ok. So I put it back on the rolling road again minus the body and watched carefully. After a few minutes, flames appeared again right where the brushes make contact.

As I am not familar with open frame motors or Triang, is there an easy fix for this or should I just dump the chassis and attempt to modify a modern Hornby 0-6-0 chassis? Is this a common occurrence? Had I left the shed for a while this could have been very serious!

Rob
 

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In depth idiot
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Soak the brushes in meths for an hour to help degrease them too, then leave them to dry thoroughly in a warm place overnight. This loco may have had WD40 or a similar penetrating lubricant used on it, so a complete clean up of the chassis may be a good idea.
 

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Take the motor out and remove the brushes, soak and clean as per 34C's post.

Take the rest of the motor and liberally cove in neat detergent, and clean every nook and cranny by working it in with a stiffish 1/2" paintbrush.

Leave to soak in the neat detergent for a wee while, rinse and repeat. Rinse with hot water so drying is faster.

Air dry it and give the commutator slots a clean as per Brians post then reassemble.

Glue some 1,000 grit or finer wet and dry onto a thin wood strip (about 5mm wide) or some stiffish styrene (any waterproof glue is OK). Wet the wet and dry and with the motor conencted to DC and spinning fast, polish and true the commutator, polishing it to an even, mirror finish. Just be a wee bit carful of the inside edge where the coil wires are soldered.

Re-clean the slots, use the tinyest bit of oil (a pinhead each bearing) and it will run better than ever.

Richard
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the advice guys, I'll get onto it asap!

Rob
 

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QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 1 Jan 2009, 05:40) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>a thin wood strip (about 5mm wide)
The ones provided for stirring the overpriced coffee at Barstucks are ideal for this (& other modelling uses) - not that I'm suggesting grabbing a handfull of them !
 

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QUOTE (Brian Considine @ 1 Jan 2009, 23:04) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The ones provided for stirring the overpriced coffee at Barstucks are ideal for this (& other modelling uses) - not that I'm suggesting grabbing a handfull of them !

No - you usually leave that to me!!


Regards
 

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DT
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You can run it underwater for a while to clear out oil and carbon deposits. Connect the motor leads to a 9 volt battery to do this.

If the idea shocks you a little... the Scalextric slotcar tuners do this to help run in the motor or to get an old motor in good working order.

No chance of bursting into flames
 
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