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Dogsbody
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Ive juse been reading another thread discussing the aquisition of a continental train set at a model railway exhibition.

It just got me thinking. When coaches go over rail joints there was that clickity click sound that was so distinctive. It's difficult to reproduce it because we either use long flexible track or we have short set track. I wonder if cheap (or cheapish) replacement bogies could be made for retrofitting that could go clickity click ?
 

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Another solution is that adopted by Howes in their Class 108 sound chip which is to make it available on an extra function switch-but you have to turn it off as otherwise it is clickity clicking while stationary
 

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QUOTE (BVM @ 23 Feb 2009, 11:54) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Another solution is that adopted by Howes in their Class 108 sound chip which is to make it available on an extra function switch-but you have to turn it off as otherwise it is clickity clicking while stationary


lol - well it could be the sound of the conductor issueing tickets inside on his machine - the one on our local train - his machine goes clickety click ... only difference when the train is moving is that its louder clickety clicking!
 

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Just another modeller
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*** The "rail click" sound has been in most ESU decoders since the very early days of train sound - but its often low on the function priority so while it may still be on the chip, it may be unassigned - and its not easy to redassign it without a lokprogrammer.

I use a different click sound on my Deltic chips (train running slower over pointwork) so its nice to use for a few moments when approaching a station, but its one of those sounds that has to match both train, train speed and location so is hard to do "generically" in such a way its always appropriate.

Richard
 

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Dear All,

There is a ZIMO Sound Project for the carriage sounds. This includes the guard shouting "All aboard" in German (or English), the whistle, then the carriages clackety clack, then a brake squeal on stopping. The MP3 gives you a sample sequence of these sounds (German version). Try it out from the ZIMO Website.

This is intended to be installed in the carriage and there are some instructions in a "readme" file, which can be found if you download the sound project itself (in a zip file at the above link).
 

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I also get these sounds as some one pointed out to me,must be bad track laying!!
Said person thought I created it for more realism,did'nt tell him otherwise! He may find out soon because I think he is joining this forum.His new layout is based in Truro,'n' gauge european with catenery,Roco I think he said.
 

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Something I did with my London Transport CO/CP stock, before I had any otehr LT stock, was to line up two coaches coupled togetehr, then mark the track where the leading wheel from each coach was. I file notches in the track at each of those marks all the way (between points and crossings). This meant tht all of the clickety-clacks from each wheel were synchronised, helped considerably by the shear weight of the white metal carriages. I would have to say it was very successful, but only works properly if all of the stock used is of the same length!, Of course, the clickety-clacks got out of synch over points or crosings and that sounded good too - just like the real thing!
 

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I am imagining all the DCC sound buffs going away to invent a system that will synchronise the rail noises to speed, adjust them for the number and type of vehicles (four-wheel wagons sound totally different) and shut off the sound when the train passes onto continuous welded rail or into the fiddle yard. So much effort to achieve what can be done in a few minutes with a hacksaw...
 

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Just another modeller
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*** Nope, I'm about as "DCC sound involved" as it gets but I'm a great fan of making it happen the way it should - directly via wheels on rail... I also like to change the nature of the underlying main trackbed in places in specific ways to change the nature of the trains sound - for example a train on a viaduct should sound totally different to the same train on mother earth!

I also like to have the sleepers closer at the end of each track panel to match the simulated gap... all far easier than trying to do it digitally and in the end, its actually more real coming from where it should anyway!

There's also a certain satisfaction in getting a benefit in sound from accuracy in tracklaying. It does take time and care though, and there's a fine line between the look being tolerable and the gap actually being big enough for a "click".

Richard
 

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Paul Hamilton aka &quot;Lancashire Fusilier&quot;
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Going out on the "DCC solves all solution", how about a sensor located at each 60' which triggers a clickety-clack via a small speaker mounted beneath the track every time a wheel set goes over it? The sensor, sound chip and speaker could be an integral board and purchased in packs of ten for say AU$39.95?
 

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Bog Snorkeller
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Just nick the rail tops with a cutting disc in your Dremel every scale 60' [every 240mm in OO or 120mm in N]
Using metal wheel sets, you'll have all the clickety clack you need coming from where it's supposed to - the wheels of the passing train. It adjusts itself automatically to the speed of the train, identifies whether it's standard or non standard wheel bases on wagons or even bogies on coaches, stops the moment the train has passed and, depending on your baseboard structure, can be made loud or soft. It doesn't need a power supply, speakers, switches, dismantling of stock nor wiring in and also needs no maintenance or adjustment. It works ontime, everytime so is absolutely 100% reliable but, best of all -
it's FREE.

Sometimes the old fashioned ways can be best.

Mike
 

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Surely, if you have rail gaps every scale 60' most of the clicks will merge into more of a rattle & loose the effect ?
Would it not be better to have the gaps about every half average train length ?
 

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Bog Snorkeller
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QUOTE (Brian Considine @ 26 Feb 2009, 08:12) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Surely, if you have rail gaps every scale 60' most of the clicks will merge into more of a rattle & loose the effect ?
Would it not be better to have the gaps about every half average train length ?
Nope. I did it on mine last year and, as 60' is, or was, the average rail length used on UK railways (prior to welding) it sounds spot on to me. You get the authentic 'clickety click - clackety clack' when a train of coaches passes over at something like a scale speed, and the click, click, click as wagons pass over. I also 'nicked out' the very top of joins at pointwork (without destroying the integrity of the join) to get more of the multi clicks and clacks heard when trains pass over these areas.

Coaches and wagons are made more or less to scale, why not have scale lengths of track as well, to reproduce scale clicks and clacks? If you're modelling continuous rail you don't want them anyway.

If you're happier with them every half average train length [whatever that is] that's okay and is fine by me and is probably a good starting point. Have a listen and if you think you need more, put more in, after all said and done, you're the one who is listening to it. Personally, I prefer scale 60' as this is the sound I remember so well from days long past in my youth sitting on some sunny embankment watching the trains go by or later, in my office which was at the side of the Erewash Valley main line at Toton.

Mike
 

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What about getting the rumble and squeel noises though? Sometimes just clickety is not enough.... now I'm thinking a motion sensor in a wagon every so often tied to a sound chip....
 
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