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***Hi John

firefox = a picture icon only in your post, but I can right click and view the image, so yes its probably just a settings issue as the picture has to actually be there to do what I did.

regards, Richard
 

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QUOTE (Dave Smith @ 30 Jul 2019, 09:21) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi John,

I also only see picture place holder, I have MS Edge on Windows 10

Cheers
Dave
Thanks Dave. I'm also running the same as you, but have only had the computer just over a week so still sorting things out.....
If I find the answer to the problem I'll post it here.

John
 

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Still can't work out what setting I need to alter to see pictures!

Reminder: Heritage Open Days: We are open for the second weekend of this annual event, on the 21st and 22nd of September, from 10am to 5pm. Extra displays, exhibits and a passenger-carrying railway in the adjacent carpark.

See www.sigbox.co.uk for location details etc.

John Webb
 

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Discussion Starter · #205 ·
I've switched back to the old laptop to do some posting of recent events. (Still can't work out what I need to alter in MS Edge!)

The renovated narrow-gauge tipper wagon sitting on our narrow-gauge point:

We keep it tipped most of the time to stop rainwater collecting in it!

The panel that was unveiled at St Albans City Station at the end of July:


The Lord-Lieutenant of Hertfordshire having placed a wreath at the permanent site of our WW1 railwaymen's memorial:


At the end of August, while King's Cross was closed, we saw our first class 800s on the Midland Mainline when Hull Trains ran into and out of St Pancras:

(Note NR's somewhat untidy dump almost on our doorstep!)

Just before Heritage Open Days we received a number of items from one of our members who's downsizing his collection before moving house.
Our third Midland Railway lamppost:

This will go at the north end of the garden to light part of the garden path currently unlit.

Two joint railway boundary posts:


A 'to be restored' fog signal:


Heritage Open Days saw 379 visitors (compared to 468 last year) and 29 demonstrations on the operating floor over the two days.

John Webb
 

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John


Is that a "fog signal placer"? AFAIL except on London Underground "Fog Signals" - aka "detonators" - are those lovely round things placed on the rail that go "BANG" when a wheel strikes them. Am I right in thinking that your "new" rusty item is for placing those?...
Also - which railway company was it from lease?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #207 ·
QUOTE (Bear 1923 @ 1 Oct 2019, 08:54) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>John


Is that a "fog signal placer"? AFAIL except on London Underground "Fog Signals" - aka "detonators" - are those lovely round things placed on the rail that go "BANG" when a wheel strikes them. Am I right in thinking that your "new" rusty item is for placing those?...
Also - which railway company was it from lease?

Thanks

As we understand it, it was what told the 'Fogman' what the signals were showing so he could place detonators appropriately. No idea at present which company it is from; we hope our member we got it from can tell us in due course.

Regards,
John
 

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QUOTE (John Webb @ 30 Jul 2019, 00:40) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'd be grateful if someone could tell me if this photo is visible or not, and which browser they are using...

Nothing to do with browser settings.

The URL is actually a programmatic URL which resolves to a web page, not an image file.
 

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QUOTE (Graham Plowman @ 1 Oct 2019, 11:52) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Nothing to do with browser settings.

The URL is actually a programmatic URL which resolves to a web page, not an image file.

Graham - thanks for that information. I take it that, for example (in {} brackets to display whole), {http://www.sigbox.co.uk/resources/000/313/543/19-09-21_HODs_1._Entrance_Small_.jpg} isn't liked by Microsoft Edge as a URL for an IMAGE statement then, but is acceptable to Internet Explorer and some other browsers? Interestingly I can click on the above URL and instantly get the image displayed!

Regards,
John
 

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QUOTE (John Webb @ 1 Oct 2019, 09:38) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>As we understand it, it was what told the 'Fogman' what the signals were showing so he could place detonators appropriately. No idea at present which company it is from; we hope our member we got it from can tell us in due course.

Regards,
John

Thanks John

That makes the device a Fog Signalman's signal indicator. I suspect that they tended to be provided by the signal manufacturing companies rather than made by the railway companies. They were predominantly installed where there was heavy traffic so that the Fog Man had quick information about the signal indication. This also meant that they tended to be at the locations that had detonator placers - which were installed to reduce the risk of Fog Men getting hit by trains (rather than to avoid any danger from the detonators themselves - railway "dets"/fog signals were substantially safe).

Where there were multiple tracks (and the various signals for them) both indicators and det placers could be located in safe positions - usually to the side of the track in the cess area. This meant that one fog man could signal a number of lines and not have to cross or get near the track.

I think that these indicators were made more necessary by Upper Quadrant signals - because their counterweight was usually close to the top of the signal where it couldn't be seen in a fog. With a Lower Quadrant signal the counterweight was normally at or near the base of the post making it possible to be seen by the Fog Man - also by train crew at the signal.

I knew Southern Drivers who had had to climb signal ladders to discover the position of the UQ signal arm during "pea soup" fogs in the 1950s and 60s.

There were many designs of det placer. Some of them were "single shot" that had to be reloaded each time - others had a magazine and a mechanism to feed the next det into the holder that put them on the rail head.

At one (I think early) stage the practice at some places (?on some companies?) two detonators a number of feet apart were used for fogging. This was to ensure that at least on should go off (i.e. the dets were less reliable at that time). In order to not waste a second det when the first exploded there was a device that would lift the second det if/when the first went off - the "blast" from the first being enough to flip the mechanism and move the second. This had a single det holder at each end of a rod mounted beside the rail. The device presumably had to be kept well lubricated. It would have had the advantage that, if the first det did blow the second could be put back on the rail as soon as the train had cleared - meaning that there would be a t least one det in place almost immediately. As far as I know these devices were never used with magazine placers.

Fogging was a cold, wet, horrible job that could last for days. Fog huts were not always provided and those that were ,were usually small and not necessarily much use. Even if they did have a small iron stove the fog man had to acquire fuel for it - which may well have been a lump or two of coal from loco crew in steam days... A good reason to keep friendly with loco crew - especially if they might not bother to slow down to deliver the lumps of coal. Where there was an indicator I might suspect that a fog man might find a way to sit an empty bean tin (or similar) on the top of the indicator arm so that it would fall off and clatter when the signal aspect changed - this might allow him some rest from observing the indicator and, possibly, let him get into a little shelter.

When dets are used for other purposes (except train protection) - such as flagging signals - their use is known (unofficially) as "banging down" - i.e. providing a caution signal to train crew.

B)
 

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An 'End of Year' Update - for photos and full details see http://www.sigbox.co.uk/sigbox/news/news_2019.eb

Highlights - 3,366 visitors in 2019 - 39% increase on 2018's visitor numbers and a new record.
Positive reviews on the "TripAdvisor" website keep us as the 10th most popular attraction of 40 in the St Albans Area.

Next Open Afternoons 2-5pm: January 12th and February 9th - remaining dates in 2020 to be available in next week or so.

Regards,
John
 

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Due to the 'Corona Virus' we have had to take the decision to close the signal box to all public visits until further notice.

Please visit our website www.sigbox.co.uk for the latest information. (See the 2020 news page for recent updates on work at the box.)

Regards,
John Webb
 

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Discussion Starter · #215 ·
QUOTE (Julian2011 @ 16 Mar 2020, 21:40) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Sad, John, but very sensible and preventative. It's not easy to make decisions like that, but is an example to others, determined to help keep people safe.

Julian
Most of our volunteers are close to or over 70 and may find themselves unable to attend, let alone the possibility of being told to close anyway! Hence our decision.

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #216 ·
During the 'Lockdown' several volunteers who lived within walking distance of the box kept calling in and kept a eye on the box and the garden, doing what they could to cut the grass and keep weeds in check. With the easing of some restrictions we have recently restarted the regular working party once a week with appropriate precautions. (Last week I spent much of two hours trimming back 40ft plus of overgrown hedge to get access to a cable duct.)

But we are still unable to open to the public - our small size, limited access and the 70+ age of the majority of our volunteers makes things difficult. So we are currently planning 'Virtual Heritage Open Days' in September when we shall put up a number of videos that are currently being made around the box and garden for people to see us. Has one advantage - we can give people a ride round the garden railway, something we can't do in real life!

John
 

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We are fairing a bit better at the gun club. (most of our squad is at least 60 plus and most 70 plus)
We shoot 6 to a detail and of course we are apart. (Skeet) So there's no problem there.
 
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