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I have been looking for an art deco style station building without much joy, preferably pre built resin type but a plastic kit would do .I am completely incapable of scratch building one.
 

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QUOTE (ianico @ 2 Apr 2009, 08:26) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I am completely incapable of scratch building one.

I doubt that, especially if you're happy to build a kit. Making models is not a massively difficult skill, and can easily be learnt through endeavour and practice. Give it a go - you might surprise yourself and you can only get better at it by trying.


G.
 

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QUOTE (Grahame @ 2 Apr 2009, 08:55) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I doubt that, especially if you're happy to build a kit. Making models is not a massively difficult skill, and can easily be learnt through endeavour and practice. Give it a go - you might surprise yourself and you can only get better at it by trying.


G.
Hi ianico,
As Grahame says, give it a go, there are a number of buildings on my layout project that will have to be scratchbuilt and they are significant structures:

This is a half size (so circa 1/296 scale) mock-up of the station hotel made from a paper print-out of a design I cobbled together with basic software, glued onto a cereal box card shell to 'prove' the design - this is the very first one I've ever attempted
, I know it's rough now but it'll be refined before I start on the full size model - and there will be several more to be put together that I don't even have basic drawings for.
Paper and card are very cheap materials - I recycle the paper from discarded office printouts that would otherwise just be binned, and if you get it wrong at first then you've learnt from it and you can give it another go, as with any other aspect of modelling. Once you've got something you're happy with then you can then transfer the design to whatever medium you're happiest working in.
If you do try scratchbuilding don't get disheartened with 'failures', and don't forget that there are much more experienced people than me on this forum that can advise you so don't be worried about posting images of your efforts at what you're trying to achieve

If you really have to look at kits then try some of the sites specialising in European and US products such as:
http://www.mgsharp.com/index.htm (there are, of course, others)
You may find a building you can either use straight from the box or adapt.

Regards, Gerry.
 

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I would have to agree with the points made above. You never know till you try! I started out making kits, then went on to kit bashing (modifying kits to suit my purpose) and am now in the process of scratch building a goods shed for the clubs new layout. You will make mistakes along the way but its all part of the learning process, plus you get the added satisafaction of knowing that there is no other model railway out there with the same building!
Steve
 

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I model the same era and I am pretty sure there is nothing art deco available in N gauge either RTP or kit.

Having said that I would seriously suggest trying scratchbuilding. Art Deco has the advantage of being fairly easy in this regard as the most common form (cubist) is very easy to model as all the angles are 90-degrees (and you can finish it off with a coat of white paint if you want the rendered concrete look).

Standard construction technique involves 2 layers of 40-thou plasticard laminated together for the walls with some internal bracing to prevent warping. If you want some more specific details, try getting British Railway Modelling June 2005. In it Paul Bason scratch-builds the art deco creamery at Moreton in the Marsh. OK he does it in 4mm but the techniques used are pretty standard and it shows how easy it is to model art deco.
 

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If you want art deco stations you could do worse than look at some of those built by LT and the SR - mind you some have some interesting curves.

Regards
 
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