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I am planning a new layout which for the first time will be a double track round the room type. It will be set in the 1950s and midland region of British Railways. It will have a simple through station (no loops or bays) with two or three sidings for freight.

I want the track in the station to be reasonably prototypical. I know that there should be no facing points. I have seen track diagrams where the entry to the goods yard is by trailing lead from one line directly into the sidings. Others have a trailing lead into a headshunt which then goes into sidings. Sometimes there are two crossovers between the main lines and sometimes only one.

In each case how would the yard be shunted by a train arriving from either direction? Was pick-up freight usually shunted from one direction only? Sorry if this has been dealt with before but I can't find it having done a search.
 

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if you opt for a lead straight onto a headshunt, then you will likley have problems forming a train...since you'll need the headshunt to shunt, without fouling a mainline.

the direction a freight will pick up from will depend on the direction of the sidings, and availbility of run round facilities.

I would opt for an arrival/ departure road....maybe a refuge loop, to get freights out of the way of faster stuff.

then if needed, a headshunt to protect the main line......then you'll have somewhere to potentially form up a freight, without pinching valuable siding space?

I'm aware of the Midland's dislike for facing points..so bearing this in mind, it would be wise(!) to place any crossovers on the main...in such a position that a freight departing in the direction opposite to the yard site, will not need to back up on the main...ie can access straight across.......[maybe use a diamond switch?]
 

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QUOTE (Robert Stokes @ 2 Jul 2007, 18:03) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>In each case how would the yard be shunted by a train arriving from either direction?
Your question was a useful exercise since I am planning a large layout! Perhaps like this?


Only the options with a * are possible with a single or no points.

I'm sure there are others here who know shed loads about this sort of thing, esp. those who have worked on the railway! Perhaps you should draw a trackplan, visualise moving the trains round and make adjustments as necessary...just make sure it's fun to operate! Real life can at times be a right pain in the posterior and it can actually be very theraputic to defenstrate realism.

Goedel

P.S. Do trains usually drive on the left in the UK? I can't remember...
 

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Robert,
Do try and get a look at Bob Essery's latest book "Railway Signalling and Track Plans" by Ian Allan. This is the sort of question that his book tries to help railway modellers find and understand the answer to.

Goedel - yes, they do run on the left in the UK, generally speaking.

Regards,
John Webb
 

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prototype track plans are very revealing......if somewhat disillusioning due to the sheer sizes involved...but if you can find a simple prototype to follow, do so....can't get any more realsitic in terms of operation.

even if you shorten some things up, or miss bits out.

For years I avidly ploughed through the writings of US modellers on the subject of trackplanning and operation......sometimes working out the sheer theory of operation, ie what was needed...IN PRACTICAL TERMS....simply out-did what was actually found in prototype practice.

I found difficulty in knowing ''when to stop''...

I rather like the idea of simply modelling a small portion of a bigger whole.
 
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