Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
982 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Haven't seen it on here, but have had notification that Locomotion, the model shop attached to NRM has announced a limited edition model of the GNR Stirling Single. Suspect a few on here will be interested. Be warned the cheapest model is £199. The £200 model (after postage) is with us in the UK.

Interestingly it's Rapido that are making it. Their first steam loco. Possibly Bachmann now too expensive or no capacity at Kader?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,844 Posts
I'm sure it's not a coincidence that the wacky "Carry on APT-E" video on Rapido's web site - http://www.rapidotrains.com/audiovideo.html features the Stirling single.

Rapido's announcement of the Stirling Single can be read - here.

A 32mm diameter driving wheel would be quite something to see!

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
982 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
£200 for something that would probably sit in a display case is not a goer for me. I can see how you would get to that cost though. There is probably a limited market. Fitting the mechanism and getting the correct gearing for that large single driver will be a challenge. I wonder how they'll do that'd front bogie as well as very tight clearances there. It is a nice, although antiquated looking loco but with no rolling stock suitable to run with it, I think it will only sell in relatively low numbers .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
I wouldn't be too sure, it is elegance personified, I can see a big demand for it. I model South American and I am tempted!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
982 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
QUOTE (Bill Veloz @ 8 Apr 2015, 21:56) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I wouldn't be too sure, it is elegance personified, I can see a big demand for it. I model South American and I am tempted!

Good point Bill. There could well be an international dimension to this where people buy it because of the attractiveness. Elegant is a good description!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,611 Posts
Got to say it does look good.

And to be honest the pricing is what I would consider to be reasonable.

Maybe with the production of the locomotive, it might inspire matching wagons????????????????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
The GNR Stirling Single will be a collectable item. I think it will sell just because its an iconic British loco.
I will be ordering one with the original tender. I will probably run 4-6 LNER teak clerestory's behind it. Maybe a re-enacting of 1938.
I have a Bachmann HO Emily which is to become GNR 1003. Checking photos this is the best option for Emily.
I am in Australia. In 2011 I visited Shildon with my wife who is 5' 4". The GNR single was being worked on, so took a photo with my wife in front of that 8' wheel.

Mark in Oz
 

·
Dragon Trainer
Currently residing at Dragon’s Edge, living on The Edge! 😀
Joined
·
1,292 Posts
QUOTE (rb277170 @ 8 Apr 2015, 22:27) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>£200 for something that would probably sit in a display case is not a goer for me. I can see how you would get to that cost though. There is probably a limited market. Fitting the mechanism and getting the correct gearing for that large single driver will be a challenge. I wonder how they'll do that'd front bogie as well as very tight clearances there. It is a nice, although antiquated looking loco but with no rolling stock suitable to run with it, I think it will only sell in relatively low numbers .

A pity that Tri-ang didn't make one in the 1960s...to go with the Dean Single and Caley 123....They could have used the Kitmaster model for inspiration.


It is also pretty certain that this model will not make it into the Great British Locomotives Collection as a source for "inspiratiion!"
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
7,678 Posts
It's going to be interesting watching this model design develop, Rapido having shown a good commitment to an information flow. Because there's some real choices to be made in just what is going to be possible for an OO RTR model. If it is as good as I hope, I don't doubt that sales will be made all around the world, as some earlier posters. I have already alerted a couple of continental friends who were just blown away by it on display in the NRM, and simply couldn't understand how this subject didn't have a model available.

(sarah @ 9 Apr 2015, 17:52) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>A pity that Tri-ang didn't make one in the 1960s...to go with the Dean Single and Caley 123...
Probably thought it looked too much like an A3 pacific - or another of the strange reasons they used to come up with for their subject choices - resulting in a range largely big express locos and small tank engines, with far too few intermediate power models, and the pretence that something like the B12 was a mixed traffic design. Not that adding a Stirling single would have assisted in balancing their range better...
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
7,678 Posts
The NRM have asked for the balance by e-mail, so it is imminent. I have obediently choked up the dough. Having followed the information released by Rapido over its rather protracted development, am now looking forward to the eight feet diameter wheel gracefully turning as it wings along at a scale 70mph.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,007 Posts
Interesting model the trailing wheels are geared to the main driver so it works as a 4-4-0 as opposed to just 2 drivers. I rather fancy one but I doubt I can justify the dosh right now.......
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
7,678 Posts
One of my first explorations with this new toy will be to see if the rear axle drive can be disconnected easily, and then to assess performance. It only has to move itself independently, the way I am setting things up for its 'BR period in preservation' runs.

I have stuffed the modified working gubbins from a Heljan class 128 inside a Gresley full brake to power any train. So both the Single and the Atlantic will have no trouble at all with express speed on full size ECML train formations. (And visiting power of less puissant origins won't be able to start the same train at all, just to add to the fun.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
Hi 34C Just exactly why would you want to remove the drive to the trailing axle ?? That would be the last thing I would want to do even if I only wanted it to pull itself. For a
start it might give problems with pick-up as the wheel might not be rotating against the wipers (assuming it has wipers ?) Secondly it will increase the likelihood of the wheel not
rotating when running due to pick-up friction. When I motorized my Kitmaster model with a Dean single chassis I did think of driving the rear axle but in those days I had no idea
how I would do it I had never heard of compensation which would have improved traction had I fully loaded the boiler but there was little room for any more weight. I look
forward to your reasons with great interest.
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
7,678 Posts
Very simple reason. The big driving wheel should slip starting under load, the fully exposed trailing wheel shouldn't. While not quite as objectionable as mighty powered tenders moving before the locomotive does, I would really prefer unpowered wheels to be so. From what has been described this model is either all wheel, or at least the two driven loco wheels and tender wheels collecting, which should be adequate for pick up even if pick up has to be disabled on the trailing wheels.

I will assess practicality before charging in mind...
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
7,678 Posts
Have it, and the model is most satisfactory in all respects. Looks fabulous, runs well, pulls a larger load then the real thing would be seen with. Lined up with the Ivatt Atlantic and a Gresley pacific, the true and onlie path to maximum power UK express traction pioneered at Doncaster GNR is very evident.

One slight lack, no exploded diagram, though in all other respects the documentation with it is to the standard expected with RTR HO models.

Icing the cake, NRM Locomotion are proceeding with a matching GNR coach stock project.
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
7,678 Posts
Apparently this big wheel type was termed a 'Bicycle' in North America.

This was how you made a speedy loco back in 1870, the big wheel kept the stroke rate down. This was a good plan given the still somewhat rudimentary science behind lubrication, and a loco capable of exceeding 80mph. Procedures such as walking along the loco's footplating while coasting, opening the smokebox door and dropping a lump of tallow down the blast pipe were not unknown at this time. Fastest transport on the planet when first running and enjoyed much fame. I have no way of verifying this, but in my youth a then elderly friend of my parents with a most extensive stamp collection claimed that he had an example of every stamp printed showing the Stirling single, and that it was the locomotive most represented on postage stamps!

Whatever, the model is a corker and the add on bogie wheel splashers and other detail parts just ice the cake. You can tell I am just a little pleased with it can't you?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
QUOTE (34C @ 31 Jul 2018, 15:48) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Whatever, the model is a corker and the add on bogie wheel splashers and other detail parts just ice the cake. You can tell I am just a little pleased with it can't you?

I would if I knew what the term "corker" meant...


Mark in Oregon
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
7,678 Posts
The slang of my youth for 'rather good'. (Probably equates to the 'wicked' much used by the teens of 10 years ago, What is now current I wonder?)
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top