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QUOTE (34C @ 31 Jul 2018, 16:50) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The slang of my youth for 'rather good'. (Probably equates to the 'wicked' much used by the teens of 10 years ago, What is now current I wonder?)

I figured as much.

Back in the early '80s, when I lived "Down East" on the Maine Coast, the term "wicked" meant the same: in fact, there was a line of potato chips ("crips?") that carried the name brand of "Wicked Good".


I think the current word is..."sick".

Mark (now) in Oregon
 

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QUOTE (Mark Mugnai @ 31 Jul 2018, 19:32) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I figured as much.

Back in the early '80s, when I lived "Down East" on the Maine Coast, the term "wicked" meant the same: in fact, there was a line of potato chips ("crips?") that carried the name brand of "Wicked Good".


I think the current word is..."sick".

Mark (now) in Oregon

Nope - "sick" is the result of eating the crisps .....

Kind regards

Julian
 

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It has a decoder fitted now, following a slightly tense wrestling match to get access to the decoder socket. Having removed the two designated screws from the tender underside
(hint, these are the two you cannot see easily) the all cast metal tender body began to lift off per instructions, albeit against some resistance, until it began to stick tight. Much
looking inside later, I employed brute force and it transpired that the screw locators inside the body were binding on the blanking plug of the DCC socket. After that went smoothly
enough until it came time to relocate the screws to resecure the tender. Navigating a tiny screw down an obstructed path to a screw hole you cannot see... Let's just say that after
relocating the pair of these I will drill out the imitation coal and go in topsides if there has to be a next time!

The running all one can ask for, truly lovely in motion.
 

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QUOTE (34C @ 1 Aug 2018, 00:48) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Procedures such as walking along the loco's footplating while coasting, opening the smokebox door and dropping a lump of tallow down the blast pipe were not unknown at this time.

Wow. I never knew that. Walking around the footplate would be dangerous enough but openning the smokebox door while coasting! They never really did that did they?
 

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(Maz066 @ 8 Aug 2018, 14:35) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>...Walking around the footplate would be dangerous enough but opening the smokebox door while coasting! They never really did that did they?
That's why cabs were narrow, and there was continuous footplating and a handrail on the boiler side, so the crew could walk round. As late as 1913 the accident inguiry into the
Ais Gill collision heard evidence that driver Caudle had gone around his engine oiling the axleboxes while in motion, which was contributory to his not observing signals. The
presiding inspector thought it time that this practise ceased... (The loco was pulling a portion of the Night Scotch express.)

You think that's dangerous? At much the same date a passenger aircraft had an open promenade so that those on board could enjoy a healthy walk in the fresh air.
 

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QUOTE (34C @ 9 Aug 2018, 01:51) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>That's why cabs were narrow, and there was continuous footplating and a handrail on the boiler side, so the crew could walk round. As late as 1913 the accident inguiry into the
Ais Gill collision heard evidence that driver Caudle had gone around his engine oiling the axleboxes while in motion, which was contributory to his not observing signals. The
presiding inspector thought it time that this practise ceased... (The loco was pulling a portion of the Night Scotch express.)

You think that's dangerous? At much the same date a passenger aircraft had an open promenade so that those on board could enjoy a healthy walk in the fresh air.
 

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My model arrived this week. In partial response to 34C's observation about east coast mainline steam power development, here's a photo of the Single with an A1 in the background.



David
 

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I would guess the coach is the other recent Rapido OO release commissioned by Rails of Sheffield, the NER/LNER dynamometer car.

A further nice feature of the single and one which all makers wanting to add tender pick up to locos should imitate. Rapido have done it optimally with split axles and pick up on the
outside bearings, for no incremental drag. The tender rolls very freely indeed. (Bachmann actually have this technique employed on coaches and MU's, so know how to implement. It's
Hornby who go for maximising tender drag with inside bearings and wipers, they could make a leap forward by doing it the right way.)
 

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QUOTE I would guess the coach is the other recent Rapido OO release commissioned by Rails of Sheffield, the NER/LNER dynamometer car.
Correct. This is the 1938 version.

David
 

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Hi everyone, I was very tempted myself even all though i do not do British. DWB did you buy the Sound version and if so is it a Great sound ??. Can you do a little video of it running on YouTube ??. Babs
 

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There's this (among others) from Hornby Mag, brief demo of their sound fitted sample running, starting and stopping.

I doubt you will be disappointed. The silent model is what I chose and is delightful.
 

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I went for the sound fitted version. The video that 34C linked is a good representation. You can also see a bit of wheel slip as it starts that six coach train.

The only thing I would add is that there is function button with a weight icon on it to simulate the loco working harder. When it's on the chuffs get deeper.

Another point is that being an ESU decoder (loksound select) it has RailCom so adding it to my ECoS system was simply a case of hit the RailCom button and then choose the address I wanted. All the icons were loaded directly.

David
 

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HI DWB & 34C, Thank You both for your replies, I did look at the Video I was not that Impressed myself on the sound. Maybe i am wanting too much. But never the less as long as you Guy's that have bought them are Happy that's all that matters. But I do love the Lok itself. Very nice indeed. Enjoy. Babs
 

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I am now inspecting my model with serious intent to rectify it's one significant visual defect. As so often with RTR models, the tender trails twice the distance behind the loco that it should, and there's a ridiculously lengthened fall plate covering the resulting chasm. I am sure that Jason Shron et al wince with guilt every time they look at this travesty.

And there's no easy adjustment to correct this, as with Bachmann's excellent screw locked slide (which Rapido should only steal and imitate). The result is that the neatly modelled softly sprung intermediate buffers on the tender drag box are millimetres away from bearing on the loco dragbox, and that's a shame, as it is the only tender loco I have where these are functional representations. There's going to have to be some hacking. Careful hacking...
 

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Is it not a cricket term? bit like a 'wisty castor' that sort of thing anyway a miracle one of them survived for sure. Just a shame Stanier ordered a Midland 2-4-0 loco scrapped when one turned up at works in Derby in the late 30's. Shows how thin the margin of survival truly was.
 

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... a shame Stanier ordered a Midland 2-4-0 loco scrapped when one turned up at works in Derby in the late 30's. Shows how thin the margin of survival truly was.
Bill was good at that sort of thing. When he joined the LMS in 1932, he found five old engines preserved in the Derby paint shop, and ordered them all scrapped One of them was an early North London Railway 4-4-0... The entire Derby staff dressed in sackcloth and ashes, prostrate and weeping, managed to get some old single preserved, but the other four all went.
 

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Really think they should be getting more out of the loco tooling and tool up the small tender that GNR 1 ran with when steamed as preserved. The modelled tender may be authentically correct for its service life but suspect there are many modellers who would buy a small tender version so that can authentically run in on 1970s/1980s layout.
 

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Did you know that the choice of tenders was offered at the pre-order stage? I was able to go to Locomotion about six months after the announcement, and there met Sandra Rewcastle (who was running the museum shop at the time, and will doubtless be remembered by many for her engaging personality). I was curious to ask how the tender choice was breaking, and Sandra told me it was overwhelmingly for the larger in-service tender, rather than the early Sturrock era type that was used in preservation. It was subsequently announced that the numbers for the 'preservation' tender were so small as to be uneconomic and those that had ordered this version had the option to cancel or take the larger tender.

Now I was not in the least surprised at this result. Among enthusiasts for the GNR and Doncaster's correct development of the only true path to UK maximum power steam express traction , there was always regret that no truly representative tender to accompany the eight footer had been subsequently salvaged and refurbished, as a suitable example became available when other Stirling designs went to the scrapper. (The background to this is that No 1 was originally preserved at KX Top Shed without a tender, what with the GNR being an economical operation, and repurposing any tender still fit for service from withdrawn locos. When it came to putting no 1 on show and then later into steam, a conveniently available 'old' tender was located and utilised for the purpose, it wasn't a preservation decision, just a practical one to make the loco ensemble 'complete' and then operational under its own power.)

I should think it was probably the core GNR/Doncaster interest that ordered the in-service style tender - which I certainly did - though also making the suggestion that they could have offered a 'both tenders' option, which I would have taken up. My old hand painted Kithamster tender complete with waterslide transfers really doesn't meld well with the exquisitely finished no 1...
 
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