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Personally I do not care where the motor is or what wheels it drives as long as the locomotive performs ! I have the same view on traction tyres. At the end of the day as soon as you put an electric motor into a steam outline loco you have compromised anyway.

My steam outline locomotives are a mixture of both tender & loco drive. Generally, the ones with tender drive & traction tyres have the most traction with the exception of the Trix BR44 (a 2-10-0) which is locomotive drive, motor in the cab & a metal body. We had 42 bogie coaches behind it on St.Laurent & apart from have to pull away very gently was well within its capability - we were trying to go for "44 behind a 44" but ended up with the buffers on the 44 6"/15cm behind the last coach !

Next time we have a play I will video the results but also would like to try a couple of UK outline locos for comparison.
 

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QUOTE (BRITHO @ 11 Apr 2007, 17:27) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Love to help, but I don't think my fleet would be much use Fleischmann Warships, Lima 33's, all HO of course. (Mind you the 33's are a bit gutless, but they pull enough for my needs.)

Regards

John

You'll be surprised - some small & light locomotives can be quite sure footed !
 

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QUOTE (ebaykal @ 11 Apr 2007, 18:27) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>most derailments occur with the very first guide wheels derailing first when going thru points and tight curves. Its a matter of weight I guess.
Cheers
Baykal

Check to see if there is sufficient movement in every direction for the pony truck (first guide wheels) to move. Some have the a spring on the pony truck. Some models also have to have the piston tails removed.I've never really had the problems that you are having, even with 2-10-0 locomotives.

Also check that there is enough side play in the "driving" wheels.
 
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