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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, can anyone tell me about the hornby flying scotsman model

what guage is it
is is DCC or analogue
how much it is
just anything u know

alrighty thanks by
 

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As Doug sais there are literally dozens of different flying scotsman models. it has been in the hornby catalouge since the very early days and has been pretty regularly updated. it has been available in just about evry gauge and scale over the years.

I also have one of the 2005 models and its a very nice model. although some (including Doug) have had real problems converting it to DCC.

peter
 

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QUOTE I also have one of the 2005 models and its a very nice model. although some (including Doug) have had real problems converting it to DCC.

I have formed the opinion from posts over the last year or so that the ease of conversion varies from model to model. I have "Windsor Lad" bought last summer that was one the easiest conversions I have ever done. Of course I had the benefit of Doug's review and was very wary of making sure that there was no undue pressure on the top of the boiler. I was also careful to pick a small (ish) decoder - the Zimo MX63R.

David
 

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slightly off-thread, but...has anyone read the star letter in the latest BRM mag?

subject is the hatchette partwork Flying Scotsman kit.....no real critiscm of the model, but a lamming of the magasine itself......
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE (pedromorgan @ 17 Feb 2008, 13:36) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Yes the mag was perfect for shuving under the leg of a table to stop it wobelling!

I got the first couple but money is a bit tight at the moment and my new years resoloution was to stop buying mags.

Peter
Yer well whats a decoder cos im like 14 and im new 2 it. so um yeah. btw it OO same as HO like will an OO loco run on HO track
 

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QUOTE (qweasdzxc @ 18 Feb 2008, 08:18) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Yer well whats a decoder cos im like 14 and im new 2 it. so um yeah. btw it OO same as HO like will an OO loco run on HO track
A decoder is an electronic controller that can be installed in a loco to run it on Digital Command Control (DCC). There are two commonly used methods for operating electric model railways. Either use a controller to put a variable output 0-12volts DC on the rails, which drives the motor in the loco directly: this is referred to as DC or analogue. Alternatively, there is a Digital Command Control (DCC) system which has power permanently on the rails, and uses commands encoded on the power supply to instruct decoders installed in each loco, what speed and direction the loco is to run. Most locos are still supplied ready to run on DC, so if you want to run a loco on DCC it is necessary to fit a decoder.

OO uses the same track gauge as HO, so anything sold as OO will run on HO track. HO is a true scale/gauge ratio system at 3.5mm/ft or 1:87, and is the dominant scale for model railways globally. But in the UK a hybrid system is used, called OO. This uses a slightly larger scale, 4mm/ft 1:76.2 but sticks with the HO track gauge, which is undersize at 16.5mm: at 4mm/ft it should be nearly 19mm. The reason this came about is due to the very small size, and some awkward design features of UK steam locos, compared to the rest of the world. To enable UK steam models to fit around the commercially available mechanisms of the 1930's, the body size was effectively expanded by the larger scale, to give a little more 'wiggle room' when fitting mechanisms.
 

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Although I left out any mention of AC and three rail systems; on the basis that someone young and living in Australia was unlikely to encounter that system, so it was probably safe to not mention it in the interests of simplicity.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
QUOTE (34C @ 18 Feb 2008, 09:50) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>A decoder is an electronic controller that can be installed in a loco to run it on Digital Command Control (DCC). There are two commonly used methods for operating electric model railways. Either use a controller to put a variable output 0-12volts DC on the rails, which drives the motor in the loco directly: this is referred to as DC or analogue. Alternatively, there is a Digital Command Control (DCC) system which has power permanently on the rails, and uses commands encoded on the power supply to instruct decoders installed in each loco, what speed and direction the loco is to run. Most locos are still supplied ready to run on DC, so if you want to run a loco on DCC it is necessary to fit a decoder.

OO uses the same track gauge as HO, so anything sold as OO will run on HO track. HO is a true scale/gauge ratio system at 3.5mm/ft or 1:87, and is the dominant scale for model railways globally. But in the UK a hybrid system is used, called OO. This uses a slightly larger scale, 4mm/ft 1:76.2 but sticks with the HO track gauge, which is undersize at 16.5mm: at 4mm/ft it should be nearly 19mm. The reason this came about is due to the very small size, and some awkward design features of UK steam locos, compared to the rest of the world. To enable UK steam models to fit around the commercially available mechanisms of the 1930's, the body size was effectively expanded by the larger scale, to give a little more 'wiggle room' when fitting mechanisms.
Thanks that was a very clear answer.
 
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