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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This item appeared on the Maerklin website. They have managed to get 200 Maerklin locos to pull a full sized DB coach. That would be 1 to 1 scale.




On the area of railways system engineering in Munich took place on 21 February 2007 a sensational experiment. Märklin locomotives of the size H0 on a scale of 1:87 should pull an original-size IC region car of the German course AG over a distance of 10 meters. The car had nevertheless an unloaded weight of approx. 48 tons and measured scarcely 27 meters. 200 Märklin locomotives of the BR 143 with the article number 37433 were available. On 50 tracks, to 4 locomotives each arranged, they were supplied by 50 transformers with energy. To set 3,000 VA necessarily around the IC region car in motion. The experiment succeeded and the 200 Märklin locomotives pulled the 1. Class car evenly, strong over of the Guiness book of the records editorship given distance. The Märklin specialist of the 1. Märklin model course team shifted altogether 625 meters of the Märklin of C-track, pulled 1.5 km cables and set over 3.000 soldered connections. The pool of broadcasting corporations transmission "W wie Wissen" sends the pictures of the preparation and the world record travel on coming Sunday, 25 February 2007 in the 1. Program at 17.03 o'clock.

So if the coach weighed 48 tons and there were 200 coaches, does this mean that each loco was pulling a quarter of a ton?
 

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Certainly shows the pulling power of Maerklin. It would be interesting to see if other manufacturers want to take up the challenge!

Regards

John
 

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>So if the coach weighed 48 tons and there were 200 coaches, does this mean that each loco was pulling a quarter of a ton?
Not if the coach is on level ground. The weight of the coach will act in a line running at 90 degrees to the rail on which the coach rests. The locos pulling the coach have to overcome the rolling resistance of the coach along the rail. This is determined by the coefficient of friction between the wheel and the rail and that is where my memory of applied mathematics runs out..... but I'm sure there is at least one member who can pick up the baton and run with it. I for one would welcome a "refresher" on this.

David
 

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QUOTE (dwb @ 27 Feb 2007, 20:25) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>>So if the coach weighed 48 tons and there were 200 coaches, does this mean that each loco was pulling a quarter of a ton?
Not if the coach is on level ground. The weight of the coach will act in a line running at 90 degrees to the rail on which the coach rests. The locos pulling the coach have to overcome the rolling resistance of the coach along the rail. This is determined by the coefficient of friction between the wheel and the rail and that is where my memory of applied mathematics runs out..... but I'm sure there is at least one member who can pick up the baton and run with it. I for one would welcome a "refresher" on this.

David

Didn't Hornby Dublo demonstrate their Deltic doing something similar at a toyfair...? One loco pulled a child (sitting on a suitable wagon of wider gauge...!), two pulled a lady, and three a gentleman.

Alco also used a similar publicity stunt with four ladies pulling a roller-bearing equipped express steam loco to show how free running it was.

In theory, on a constant falling gradient where the rolling resistance equalled the force made up of the weight of the coach acting in a plane parallel to the track, an N gauge loco could pull a full size coach.
 

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QUOTE Didn't Hornby Dublo demonstrate their Deltic doing something similar at a toyfair...? One loco pulled a child (sitting on a suitable wagon of wider gauge...!), two pulled a lady, and three a gentleman.

1961 London Toy Fair demo. The most powerful British toy train ever? If only Hornby and Bachmann were as imaginative these days. Don't know how this feat compares with the Marklin coach pull and again friction coeficients came into play. I would guess that the friction coeficient of a full size coach relative to its mass would be lower (1 is superglued down and 0 will slide forever) than a bloke breaking his ankle falling off a skateboard type affair. Its a pretty amazing feat of strength from Marklin. Do the Marklin locos have traction tyres? I think the Dublo effort had traction tyres and was possibly the first British model so endowed. The Dublo Class 20 may have beaten the Deltic on the traction tyre front however was not as heavy.

The amount of power required for the 200 locos is interesting. Weedy pathetic powerless "safe" kids transformers are no fun!


Bring on the armour plated bullet proof battleship Hammant and Morgan and a few cattle prongs! This will sort out the men from the boys.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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QUOTE (Gary @ 28 Feb 2007, 11:51) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Its a pretty amazing feat of strength from Marklin. Do the Marklin locos have traction tyres? I think the Dublo effort had traction tyres and was possibly the first British model so endowed.
Happy modelling
Gary

They do indeed have traction tyres........as a matter of interest they are also three rail with metal bodies!

Regards

John
 

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QUOTE They do indeed have traction tyres........as a matter of interest they are also three rail with metal bodies!

What a coincidence!


Don't Marklin run a 14V AC system as opposed to Dublo's 12V DC?

This should provide more pulling power in favour of Marklin I would have thought by an extra 17%.

So we are talking high volts, metal bodies, traction tyres, 3 rail.

All the things out of favour outside Germany yet seemingly capable of doing the business.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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I wonder what would have happened if they had used the Trix (2 rail) variant?

Regards

John
 

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QUOTE I wonder what would have happened if they had used the Trix (2 rail) variant?

The track would collapse under the strain!

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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QUOTE (BRITHO @ 28 Feb 2007, 13:53) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I wonder what would have happened if they had used the Trix (2 rail) variant?

Regards

John

The Trix variants generally have only 1 axel with traction tyres wheras the Marklin ones have 2 axels with traction tyres.
 

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QUOTE (dbclass50 @ 28 Feb 2007, 14:47) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The Trix variants generally have only 1 axel with traction tyres wheras the Marklin ones have 2 axels with traction tyres.

Which could explain why they used the Maerklin variant


Regards

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Because the current collection is better with AC because it's coming from both outer rail you can afford to have more traction tyres. There was an article on the American Trix website about a Big Boy model pulling a record number of wagons but it seems to have gone now and I can't remember how many there were.
 

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QUOTE (BRITHO @ 28 Feb 2007, 13:53) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I wonder what would have happened if they had used the Trix (2 rail) variant?

Regards

John

Be interesting to know who many Trix locos would have been required - or how many equivelant loco's without any traction tyres


Another point - the Marklin stud contact track uses steel rather than nickle silver for the rail itself. It is possible that steel gives a better grip than nickle silver (& no, I'm not talking about Magnaheasion, however it's spelt).
 

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In there present climate couldn't see any of the Hornby stock being capable of pulling a 1:1 coach.
But I could certainly expect one maybe two hundred Bachmann class 66's pulling one maybe even all sound locos too that would be nice.

Pete
 

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QUOTE (dbclass50 @ 1 Mar 2007, 18:03) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Be interesting to know who many Trix locos would have been required - or how many equivelant loco's without any traction tyres


Another point - the Marklin stud contact track uses steel rather than nickle silver for the rail itself. It is possible that steel gives a better grip than nickle silver (& no, I'm not talking about Magnaheasion, however it's spelt).
The stud contact track is not used for traction unfortunately. I beleive it is the return power rail. There is a sky thing under the loco which skims it so it creates drag rather than assists with traction.
 

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QUOTE But I could certainly expect one maybe two hundred Bachmann class 66's pulling one maybe even all sound locos too that would be nice.

I wonder what 200 locos fitted with sound decoders all starting up at the same time would sound like?

It actually would never happen in prototypical form (someone will now proove that it does/did!)


I doubt that even 5000 current Hornby locos could pull one coach as without traction tyres the situation would be hopeless. Yes there are Hornby locos that can pull 15 model coaches. I wonder how many Hornby coaches a Marklin loco could pull?

200? 500?


Happy modelling
Gary
 
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