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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
QUOTE The On30 Module [email protected]@rd is a freeform module system that allows an almost limitless variety of different shaped modules. This flexibility extends to operational design as well by embracing both point-to-point and continuous running. Modules may be any length, straight or curved, and any width or shape between standard interfaces. The minimum requirements of the [email protected]@rds will also allow many different existing module types to connect. Local groups and clubs are encouraged to add standards regarding scenic treatment and themes that suit their needs, as long as the additional standards do not interfere with the connection of modules built to the minimum standard.

Yes we are all aware of the basic modular standard how ever when it's applied to On30 there's a much more relaxed approach. The above summaries what I'm talking about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
A few pictures of my slow but steady progress. I ran a couple of test trains to day, the 2 truck shay has impressive gradient climbing power, while to Forney with the Tsunami's sound decoder sounds the best.








my latest purchase.
 

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>my latest purchase.
Where do you put the coffee?


Seriously, though it's a nice looking piece of kit.

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
No I'm not into wood turning at all. I'll use the lathe to produce small bits and parts if I need them their are lots of applications. I'm interested in learning resin casting so there maybe an application for the mill as well.
I like ply it's stable compared with MDF and it's light. I'm not going for flat tops so the ply wood desert look is out, it was just handy to test a radii.
 

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I'm not into On30 my self but I have a mate who has slight disability that prevents him from modelling anything smaller. He is progressing slowly on his layout as the scenery is a time consuming occupation. Here a re a couple of pictures from the sceniked part of his layout.

The switch back climb.


Top of the switch back.


Passing through a tunnel.

His layout is set up in a standard single car garage that also doubles as his home theatre room. He also might be having a chnge of heart about On30 and moving into Scale7. We'll see what happens after his visit to the UK this June. I beloieve the "Home of O Gauge" and the NRM are high on his list of things to do.

Ozzie21
 

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That is excellent work Ozzie - my compliments to your mate.

I can only echo Neils words about the rockface - I had to look twice to convince myself it was a model !

Superb work - if he does change to 7mm I would love to see some examples of the results in the future.

Thanks for posting the pics.
 

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I'll pass on your thanks. He actually uses casting plaster which has gone off or gone past it's use by date. The frame for the rocks is just the old interlaced carboard strips covered in a couple of layers of newsprint soaked in dilute PVA glue. This forms the profile and when it's nearly dry he adds a skim coat of plaster and then the actuall plaster which is made up to go off quickly. As it's drying he starts carving with his trusty half inch chisel to get the shapes he wants. He has a geology book showing different rock strata from around the world that he uses as a guide plus pictures of the region it's supposed the layout is based in. After the plaster has dried for a couple of days he then makes various colours of diluted India Ink, blacks , browns and grays and starts spraying it about like a madman. A week or so later and that is the result.

Ozzie21
 

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Hi MMaD,

You have really been busy. Nice benchwork. I always maintain that if the benchwork is well done the layout will also be something special. Looking forward to the end product.

I support your choice of the plywood for the layout top. I have found that plywood is the most suitable especially for modules as it is lightweight and the most stable of all the materials we can choose from. Stability is very important once you start with your scenery construction where most of the methods involve the use of water and plywood has proved to be the most stable and does not get influenced by the moderate use of water. It is also very stable in extreme climatic conditions. When modules have to be moved around to shows and exhibitions you need that kind of stability to minimise damage to your modules. I moved my 5 modules called Niedlingen totalling 9 metres around quite a lot over a period of nearly 5 years and I had the minimum of damage during this period.

Tongue in the cheek on the discussion between yourself and Neil about tools - I see you have some Ozzy tools (Triton) purchased in expensive Britian!?

Had a look at your layout plan. I suppose the layout will be under Digitrax DCC but I see no reverse loop. Remember the Toblerone Kid's remarks on the subject of reverse loops?

Enjoy our fascinating and rewarding hobby.

Kind regards to Annemarie.

Johan and Anne
 

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(An open letter so anyone is welcome to comment and join in)
Yes Good Evening Johann - Annemarie says Hello to you both,
The Triton came from Macro Edenvale, it's a bit battered now but still does a good job for sheets, my chop saw does most of the work. Power tools are expensive here I find although when I needed a replacement saw to fit in the Triton, the Triton saw was cheapest at my local tool shop. There is an amazing array of specialist tools here but gaps in the Market. No Pratleys epoxy, no plastic metal of note, and no epoxy putty, I'll have 1/2 a dozen of each in my suit case. I'd like to see a few photo's of your moduals. One thing the Biltong is excellent here, and fairly freely available. I've been accumulating hobby tools at a steady rate, the selection here is fantastic, almost every show has a tool trade stand, with lots of goodies to make you drool. I collected a few more piece for my Dremel and I'm steadily adding to my collection of Proxxon items. Of course the model Engineering shows, are really something else, even Annemarie got enthusiastic.
I really haven't settled on a layout design, the main debate has been which subject. I've settled that and the On30 is going in my study, it will be more of a shunting plank L shaped 10 + 8 ft with a continuous run. I still have quite a commitment to 00 British, and that's going in my studio where I have space. I like ply as a material. I'll probably supplement that with some Masonite strips (Spline Bed) - I intend to give that a try. Yes I'm staying with Digitrax, after all its the worlds best DCC system, and I have a large commitment to the system with 6 hand sets, a DCS 100, a DB150, and various other bits and bobs. There's nothing as stable as Digitrax and at the end of the day that's what you need dependability. I thought at one time I would perhaps try another system for the On30. I was totally disappointed in Hornby's attempt at DCC, depending on reviews I might give the Bachmann Dynamis a try but that's in the future.
I'm going round to John's ( Toblerone Kid) to collect a batch of TCS decoders, I'm not sure exactly when, but the prices are competitive compared to the UK.
regards
for now I'll contact you on my return.
MMD
 

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QUOTE He has a geology book showing different rock strata from around the world that he uses as a guide plus pictures of the region it's supposed the layout is based in. I thought he might have done something like that as it's pretty realistic. Generally people who don't know much about geology model rock strata on the basis of how easy it is to slap on plaster or whatever they are using to mould the rock face and it looks this way. Rock strata has fairly definite forms in it's natural state due to the basic crystaline structure from which it's composed. Different types of rocks weather in different ways for this reason and many areas can be recognised from the rock strata, assuming you know about this sort of thing.
 

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QUOTE (neil_s_wood @ 23 Feb 2007, 02:36) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I thought he might have done something like that as it's pretty realistic. Generally people who don't know much about geology model rock strata on the basis of how easy it is to slap on plaster or whatever they are using to mould the rock face and it looks this way. Rock strata has fairly definite forms in it's natural state due to the basic crystaline structure from which it's composed. Different types of rocks weather in different ways for this reason and many areas can be recognised from the rock strata, assuming you know about this sort of thing.

Blimey Neil - I didn't know you were a geologist as well (TIC). However you are quite right, and it applies to all rock faces down to chalk. If you are modelling rock of any description then it is essential to either visit and photograph your chosen area or invest in tourist guides. (of which sometimes holiday brochures can be of use)

Regards

John
 

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QUOTE (BRITHO @ 24 Feb 2007, 00:11) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Blimey Neil - I didn't know you were a geologist as well (TIC). However you are quite right, and it applies to all rock faces down to chalk. If you are modelling rock of any description then it is essential to either visit and photograph your chosen area or invest in tourist guides. (of which sometimes holiday brochures can be of use)

Regards

John
Yes, thats what I did my degree in. I guess if you know a lot about something you tend to notice it more. Now if someone who knew about electrics saw the wiring on my layout he'd have a fit.
 
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