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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to design (let alone build) a cliff railway - something like:



Southend Cliff Lift - Built 1912, 4ft 6ins gauge with 1ft 9ins gauge counterbalance track under, 130ft track length, 57ft rise.


One in Ketchikan, Alaska. I saw it, but didn't use it and know nothing about it.




Bergen Floibanen, Norway - Built 1918, metre gauge, 844 metres track length, 302 metres rise.

Might well go for the British style of either two parallel tracks or single track with counterbalance track below (as per Southend) or single track with counterbalance in vertical shaft as per Margate:

This one was unusual in being side-mounted, it was 5ft gauge, 69 feet track length, 50 feet rise and operated from 1913 to 1972 - the trackbed and shaft are still there with some of the winding gear.

I am rapidly losing interest in 'My Physiotherapy Project' (Any buyers?), it seems to have served its purpose.

Dave
 

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Ah, the cliff lift at the Lido (Margate) - that brings back memories, sadly not much at all remains (could take some up to date pics if you like).

AFAIK the one at Broadstairs operated on the same principle but is covered completly, sadly currently out of use.

Have you considered the water powered/ballanced ones at Folkstone, which are still operating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Have got some footage of the Margate Lido Cliff Lift in operation on the new Online Video DVD No. ON130 'Cliff Lifts of Great Britain' - there is also a companion DVD 'Piers and Pier Railways' which is currently only available through the National Piers Society and not yet publicly released.

Folkestone & District MRC have an 'O' Gauge model of the original Leas Lift as it was when opened in 1884, and I understand that someone built a larger scale version using water for his university thesis - OK, no power supply need at exhibitions, but must've been messy as hell to operate!!!!

Dave
 

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QUOTE (Piermaster @ 8 Jul 2008, 10:33) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'm trying to design (let alone build) a cliff railway - something like:

This one was unusual in being side-mounted, it was 5ft gauge, 69 feet track length, 50 feet rise and operated from 1913 to 1972 - the trackbed and shaft are still there with some of the winding gear.

This is only about 150 yards from my front door! Thanks for posting the pic Dave - I've not seen this one before.

Also I have to admit I don't remember it working as late as '72.

My vote is for Margate.

Regards
 

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There's a funicular that runs from the Lugano station down into the town. It's well worth the fare if you have cases and don't fancy hauling them up rather a large number of steps. I don't think it would make a great model; it's mostly in tunnel or cutting....

and then there's all those funiculars in Switzerland such as the one which takes you to the base of the Rheichenbach Falls near Meiringen.

David
 

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You could try the funicular at Saltburn on Sea if you wanted a challenge. I was unable to copy an image from Google Images, but below is a description

Up or Down?
View Dave J Johnson's mapTaken in Saltburn by the Sea, England (See more photos or videos here)54°35' 12" N, 0°58' 19" W54.586786-0.972032The funicular lift at Saltburn, Cleveland UK. It's been around a long time and replaced a vertical lift that was originally built to take people down to the beach. The pier was used as a docking point for ships until in rough seas one went straight through it!!
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QUOTE (Piermaster @ 8 Jul 2008, 11:33) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'm trying to design (let alone build) a cliff railway -
I am rapidly losing interest in 'My Physiotherapy Project' (Any buyers?), it seems to have served its purpose.

Dave

There's always the Cairngorm funicular with its passing loop halfway up (or is it down?), but that's just a little more than a cliff.

mal
 

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Langley Models do cars for the standard type of cliff lift. They usually have a double track version running on their stand at exhibitions.

Regards,
John Webb
 

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Well last night I took a short stroll down to the seafront to have a look at the remains of the Margate example, if you don't build it Dave I might have a go!

Looking at the slope the original, much rotted, timber baulks are still present, as are the dog spikes for holding the rails down.

The stumps of the railings at the bottom can still be seen as can part of the machine house at the top. Nowadays the brick arches have been bricked up and the chalk has receeded from around the concrete supports.

That having been said there is still plenty of data to assist in construction of a model.

If you decide on Margate let me or Brian (or both) know and I feel sure we could get some photos and measurements for you.

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My personal favourite is the Lynton to Lynmouth one, which is Grade II listed! Probably one of the oldest and linking two towns together, it is water driven and braked using a completely unique system. It is well worth a vist for a trip, the view is superb! The cars are original 1890 and not GRP 'modernised' stuff like Hastings (which is not operating at present?)

Try this link, http://www.funimag.com/funimag19/Lynton01.htm

David Y
loconotion models
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for the ideas! Saw a reproduction of a modelling article dating from 1940-41 in the book 'Cliffhangers' on how to build your own cliff railway entirely out of wood (including wheels and rails!) and operate the single car buy just adding or subtracting a coin to/from the vertical counterbalance.

I wouldn't reproduce a model like-for-like from the article, but would certainly consider it using modern materials. At least no motor, no controller, no power supply needed!

I would prefer to model a British line and my nearest for prototype research is Southend and a 520mm (20.42 inches) length of bridge channel (as produced by Atlas) would be the idea base!

The Brawa set is overpriced (typical of Brawa) and someone has one on eBay (PayPal only) bidding at around £20 - speaks volumes for its quality!!!

Langley Models kit retails at £115! I would lose less money being mugged! For I could do my Southend or Margate lift for a quarter of the price!!!

Dave
 

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QUOTE (Piermaster @ 9 Jul 2008, 17:11) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>.....Langley Models kit retails at £115! I would lose less money being mugged! For I could do my Southend or Margate lift for a quarter of the price!!!

I'd never asked them what the price was - didn't realise it was that much!


Regards,
John
 

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the langly model is quite expensive. and you dont get the top and bottom stations for that price. they are sold as extras! (i think they are sold as a cricket pavillion and you modify it)

the southend funicular i find especially interesting. i think its one of the oldest of the lot. the support column was actually the guide for one of the earliest esculators in the world. the esculator was unsuccessful so it was turned into a funicular.

Peter
 

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Personally I think there is nothing wrong with the quality of the Brawa funicula, but rather it does take a bit of work to build. To function properly it needs a slight hump in the middle of it to keep the guide wires in line on the supports.

Definately not a toy for children.

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Decisions Decisions Decisions!!!

It will be a while before I get round to it, (must get a job first, or its more contract work!) and both Southend and Margate have their own appeal so, some more pics to entertain you with:


Southend's upper station following refurbishment in 2006 with the car just in view - and the line is still not working!!!!


General view looking up the line with the 4ft 6in gauge running line and the 1ft 9in gauge counterbalance track under it. The central beam (not a rail) provides a surface for the emergency brakes to grip on to. Sorry about the tilt - the camera was arms length away from me whilst I was leaning over the fence!


The remains of Margate's lift as it is now.

Dave
 

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QUOTE (Piermaster @ 8 Jul 2008, 13:39) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Have got some footage of the Margate Lido Cliff Lift in operation on the new Online Video DVD No. ON130 'Cliff Lifts of Great Britain' - there is also a companion DVD 'Piers and Pier Railways' which is currently only available through the National Piers Society and not yet publicly released.

Dave

Thanks for mentioning this DVD - that's sorted out a birthday present for my Dad (along with the Pier Railway one, which is available from Signal Box).

I do recall making a Meccano funicular when much younger as well....

Mike D
 
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