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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
... I finally managed to get hold of a long sought after model:

The Trix B VI, Royal Bavarian State Railway, "old" style (ca. 1865).





The Mäklin version is fairly easy to get, but the 2-rail-DC Trix variant is very elusive.

The real thing was built 73 times, from 1863 on. Later versions featured a driver´s cabin, the early ones had a cab refitted.

As Bavaria was dirt poor at the time, and had no coal mines of its own, many engines (including the "TÖLZ" pictured above) were burning peat instead, and later versions featured a high peat tender. Later, around the turn of the century, they were rebuilt as coal burners.

The engines lasted until around 1923.
 

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Hi Tom,

Sounds like a collectors item you've got.
Very impressive.
Never saw this one in Trix catalogues, couldn't have missed it because of the chimney.

Baykal
 

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Very nice, very nice indeed.

But why has it got a childs baloon on top of the smokebox
(well thats what it looks like)

Regards

John
 

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QUOTE (Peter_Harvey @ 24 May 2007, 08:24) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Would the real thing be a wood berner?

Pete

No, it was a peat burner (peat) - hence the pear-shaped smokestack, as a straight stack would have blown out many sparks still being aglow from the peat´s burn characteristic that these sparks could have caused major damage to engine and environment.

These stacks allowed the sparks to fly around on the inside of the stack and cool off on the inside, rather than being directly blown out.

The coal burners of the time had smokestacks that went straight up, no pear- or cone shape about them.
 

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QUOTE (ME 26-06 @ 25 May 2007, 00:54) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>No, it was a peat burner (peat) - hence the pear-shaped smokestack, as a straight stack would have blown out many sparks still being aglow from the peat´s burn characteristic that these sparks could have caused major damage to engine and environment.

These stacks allowed the sparks to fly around on the inside of the stack and cool off on the inside, rather than being directly blown out.

The coal burners of the time had smokestacks that went straight up, no pear- or cone shape about them.
These loco's would have been really good in the North West of Scotland and the West of Ireland where peat is used as fuel. I used to live on the Isle of Harris for a while and the smell of peat burning was a noticeable feature. Lot nicer smell than coal.
 
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