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Remember that Hornby do flexible track. For all flexible track and Peco Streamline track you will need seperate packs of fishplates (track joiners) as this track does not come with fishplates fitted. All Peco track is now nickel silver. This was not always the case so if you see secondhand track it is worth seeing if it is magnetic. If it is then the rail is steel and not nickel silver which is not magnetic.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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Richard makes a good point.

If it is your intention to run new and secondhand vintage stuff on the track then best to use Hornby as secondhand stuff can derail on Peco points due to tight frogs and rail catchers. If it is your intention to operate with new stuff only and items with finescale wheels then Peco is fine. Code 75 track is harder to work with as a newbie as it is fragile and tricky to cut unless you purchase a rail cutter tool.

I like running the vintage stuff so its Hornby track for me every time and not too fussed by what others say. For a lot of point action in a short space you can't beat set track points.

The only thing is though you mention DCC and therefore there is another issue.

Do you go for insulfrog (self isolating) or electrofrog points (offering more positive running of locos over point frogs as they are live and not plastic).

If electrofrog then it has to be Peco as Hornby don't do these. Peco electrofrog points do make DCC life slightly complex from a wiring and isolating point of view.

Hornby offer a point clip (included with your train set?) that you insert into Hornby self isolating points to make them non isolating which is ideal for DCC as you can then electrify all the track without having a seperate wiring loom and no need to isolate anything.

I am keeping it all as simple and broad as I can. Others can go into the fine detail which no doubt they will!


My BIG tip would be to make the first project a SMALL one and experiment with the track that is available so that you can work out for yourself which is best for you before you start your BIG project!

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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QUOTE I have 2 Hornby Select control units to use on 2 different circuits.

QUOTE In reply to Breaston's second question, I might be revealing my naivety about DCC here but - isn't the whole point of it that you don't need two controllers for two or more trains at the same time?

True.

Whilst there is nothing wrong with having two isolated and seperately controlled circuits operated with two Select consoles and two transformers, one Select console will control everything as long as the whole layout is powered by one transformer.

If the reason for this is to do with the upper limits of the Select console then why not use an Elite with 2 knobs and more capability to control the whole layout. You can link up the Select to the Elite and use it as a second walkabout controller if it is the intention to have two operators.

Just think of the layout of any size and all its branches off as being one track on which you can run 10 trains at the same time and you won't go far wrong!

You may have two ovals (an inner and outer) and this is still one track if they are linked with points or leads.

You can control a loco shunting in the sidings at the same time as controlling a loco doing 126mph on the mainline. The whole layout is live.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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QUOTE But such crossings are not popular on the prototype because of the mutual interference between the two lines; hence the use of fly-overs or under-passes.

Even more so with DCC and the running of multiple trains on the same track.

It will be akin to figure of 8 banger racing at Hendnesford Raceway and would almost certainly lead to a similar result!

Happy modelling
Gary
 
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