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I have come across a fair quantity of Hornby 00 track that is in variable condition. I am sure that this question must have been asked before but I find no joy so here goes:-
How is it best to clean old track:- a) When it looks dirty
When there is signs of rust
I have tried household cleaner (Bar Keeper which is like Vim) but that takes everything off including any nickle surface that might still be there. Same goes for Brillo pads. Soap and water with a small brush has not much effect - still not giving a good electrical contact. Or is it best to admit defeat and buy new.
 

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If there is signs of rust then you are pretty much beaten, Buy new and avoid steel track, although it may be cheaper youll pay for it with poor conductivity and corosion problems.

Paul
 

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Hello,

I have used methylated spirits that you buy from the chemist. Do not use the standard metho from the hardware store as it has impurities in it.

Another method I used is fine emery paper and run this around the top of your track. It quickly removes the deposits leaving a shiny track.

To do this use a piece of flat timber about 500mm long (18in) that has been file so it has a slope on one side and then attached the cloth or emery paper. You can then run this around the top of the track.

If it is the old steel track or has heavy dirt using the emery paper to start and then the cloth with mehto.

If it does not work - I agree with the other comments, buy some new track

Regards

Stephen
 

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In depth idiot
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Go for new nickel silver track, it will repay you with reliable running, which will make operation a joy rather than a frustration.

One use for old plated steel track is if modelling abandoned lines or sidings. When my main run was outdoors, I used the old steel track for this in a couple of locations and it looked great. It even weathered itself naturally...
 

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I always try to use new track as pre-used stuff tends be twisted, bent, have ballast attached, tarnished, wire soldered to it or something which renders it less usable. Unless you are really strapped for cash chuck it and buy new stuff.
 

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jeez..in the age of globular warning, climate change, and disbelief in Santa Clause....whatever happened to re-cycling?

however...unless truly broke, or an accredited tightwad, new flex track is so cheap to buy.

Appearances can be changed or disguised.....

re-cycling in the oldd days before plastics, was somewhat fraught...fibre track bases, anyone?
 

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I go out and buy new track and find other uses for the old stuff.

when cleaned with fine sand/emery paper, 4 inch bits of track becomes great paint stirers, and chopping up old sleepers are useful for the general crap that is stored / dumped at the end of sidings and in engineers wagons.

Alistair
 
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QUOTE (PeterC @ 22 Feb 2008, 18:10) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have come across a fair quantity of Hornby 00 track that is in variable condition. I am sure that this question must have been asked before but I find no joy so here goes:-
How is it best to clean old track:- a) When it looks dirty
When there is signs of rust
I have tried household cleaner (Bar Keeper which is like Vim) but that takes everything off including any nickle surface that might still be there. Same goes for Brillo pads. Soap and water with a small brush has not much effect - still not giving a good electrical contact. Or is it best to admit defeat and buy new.

use methylated spirits, works like a dream. otherwise rail zip upi can buy at the hobby sjop
 

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I have to go with the buy new school of thought, this is based on experience, as when we recently rebuilt the storage loops for St Laurent I decided to see how much could be salvaged. The answer was most of the points and about 6 feet of track, some of which has been used where only a short piece of track is required.

Regards
 

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PeterC

I totally agree with the views here go for new flexitrack, mixed with points of your choice it gives a good selection as opposed to set track.

The peco track is great if you choose to use it a little more expensive than other versions of track stocked by some shops, giving more flexibility, while your in the shop purchase a set of track cutters, the initial outlay may look a bit steep but they are a joy to use and will repay you for many years to come ... i always used a slitting dics to cut track in a hobby drill but now with one snip the track is cut cleanly and ready to accept your fishplates/joiners

upnick.
 
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