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Dragon Trainer
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QUOTE (Brian Considine @ 5 Feb 2013, 18:26) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi Dave & welcome to MRF.

In your controller there will be a resistance mat & some brass/phospher bronze "wipers" - it may be possible to adjust the wipers but the mats also wear out.

Best option would, as Gavin says try ebay.

Don't forget to post some pictures.

The Tri-ang controllers used to be screwed together. Before H&S...



As Brian says, the parts do wear out, and they are no longer made new...

I did have two Tri-ang controllers, and took them both to bits, and made a good one from the best bits (NOT for the faint hearted, and I made sure to test for any escaping currents with a meter.)

One had been overheated so much that the encapsulating resin had boiled off and collected on the base plate!


The H & M Duette is pretty "bomb proof".

I see that you are using "Standard" track. Well done you.
This is not a common decision these days, as the supply of useable track is getting smaller.

I trust that you are aware that the earlier Cellulose Acetate track bases can distort, so losing the true gauge and alignment of the rails?

The post 1956 Standard track was made from Polystyrene Plastic, and is a far better bet.

It is also possible to replace the rails in Standard track with those from Series 3 track (the legths are the same), or even use the longer Super 4 straight rails on multiple Standard track bases, to cut down on rail joints. Super 4 curves are a different radius, but the rails can be modified to fit to Standard bases.

Are you aware of the Tri-ang Society, and the Train Collectors Society?

A "Standard Track" Layout Idea?

 

Dragon Trainer
Currently residing at Dragon鈥檚 Edge, living on The Edge! 馃榾
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This may sound crazy, but have you thought about double sided sticky tape.

There are some pretty strong versions out there. I think there may be tapes for laying carpets?

A smooth plastic vinyl base would not be best for a PVA bond, as it cannot soak in at all. I used some PVA to stick some grass scatter to a "formica" veneered shelf. It stuck, but is now peeling off. (This could be a way to make a "Home Made" grass sheet!)

UHU would possibly "grab" the vinyl. What does the Grass sheet manufacturer recommend?

I see you have the old turntable. Nice.

Is there anything Tri-ang you still need?
 

Dragon Trainer
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Hi Dave.

The early Tri-ang Signals are the "Non Clip Fit" metal ones (Except the Junction and Gantry Signals, which were always plastic, only the metal bases changed to the "clip fit" type in the early sixties.) They were replaced in the early 1960s by the plastic Clip Fit ones. These survived until the late 70s.

So, these plastic post signals may be easier to find...

The platform sections went to Poly in 1956-7 (No Clips) and the Poly clip type came in C1957, with the brown buildings. The Poly doesn't warp, and looks pretty much the same to the eyes.

1956 Red Poly Buildings are the best. (Though the Water Tower and Engine Sheds were always brown....)

The turntable works are quite ingenious. Friction Drive on the edge. I am thinking of modifying one to have more "stops" at a couple of extra exit tracks....
 

Dragon Trainer
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Hi.

No, I don't know the names for the colours. Probably something under the BS. scheme.

Anyway, the colours you have look good.

You may find something of interest here.

http://www.daveangell.co.uk/

Dave is a Tri-ang Collector, and a member of the Tri-ang Society.

No connection, apart from the Tri-ang Society, and I have had some small dealings with him.
 

Dragon Trainer
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QUOTE (Dave Saunby @ 27 Jul 2013, 07:09) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Please can anyone tell me if the very early 1950's Triang MK2 couplings are compatible with the later MK3 couplings which I believe replaced the MK2 in the late 1950's, as I have heard that they sometimes disconnect when going round bends?

The uncoupling problems are correct. The MK II has no "return" on the hook or bar, which the MKIII "tension lock" has.

The "official" Tri-ang method of stopping unintentional uncoupling of the MKII couplings was to use a small ring over the coupling bars of the two adjoining vehicles.

It could be possible to use some wire rod to couple MkII and MkIII couplings in the same way. As th eMKIII coupling bar is a loop, the "ring" would need to be formed around the MkIII bar (or a loop like a Key Ring?)

I hope this makes some kind of sense...


MkIIa Coupling (No "skid" on hook dropper). 1952-

MKIIb Coupling Skid "weight" added to hook dropper to help the hook drop and stay down better. -1958-9

MkIII Coupling. Tension Lock. 1959 -
 

Dragon Trainer
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QUOTE (Dave Saunby @ 21 Aug 2013, 18:21) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Thanks for all the info on couplings.

Next question.

I am thinking about raising the std grey track with Triang piers and sidewalls, from about midway down the outer edge of my 8'x4' baseboard, over a girder bridge around the top edge, and then back down the other side to continue the rest of the outer loop on the base.

Please could anyone tell me approximatly how my piers and sidewalls I would require to complete this task, and is it very successful regarding stability, and with the engines having to pull uphill?

I am using R106 outer radius curves on the top and bottom ends, with std curves on the inner line of my double track which runs around the perimeter of my baseboard.

The original Tri-ang Railways R.79 Incline piers have the lugs to locate Standard Track. The incline piers also have the top at a slight angle, and so have to be used the right way around. It is usual to have a pier at every track joint.

They come as a set, I think I remember there being 6 piers in the R.79 set. There is also the High Level Piers, which are "flat" on the top, and are the same height as the bridge deck of the Girder Bridge when mounted on the Tri-ang Bridge Piers. (Also the Gravity Unloading Bridge when mounted on the arched bridge piers.)

It is recommended that as much of the upward incline is on the straight, as the incline is quite steep. It is however as designed at Margate!

The Standard Track sidewalls are the same length as the track sections, so you will need a pair for each track section.

The straight ones are the same for both sides, the curved ones come as an inner and an outer. There are no middle sections, as Standard Track is solid.

A complete incline with walls is quite rigid, and the piers are designed to be pinned down to the board ...and looks quite good too.

The outer or second radius walls are the harder to find, as they were not made for as long as the others...
 

Dragon Trainer
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I found that a "normal" train of around 3-4 coaches went up the Tri-ang incline behind a Princess loco with no bother.

It is coming down that has to be watched, as the train can go so fast it flies off the track on the bend at the bottom of the hill!


You do need to "drive" the train, power up the hill, slow down down the hill.


Another method for the layout could be fixing most track down, and having removable sections to bridge the board joints.

I used this method for a semi-permanently laid (Super 4 track) layout on two boards. The joints were bridged with straight tracks, inserted between the fixed sections as the two boards were brought together
 

Dragon Trainer
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QUOTE (Dave Saunby @ 23 Aug 2013, 21:06) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Thanks for the advice Sarah.

I would imagine that when fitting the non fixed sections of track over the baseboard joints when the baseboard sections are being lined up and drawn together is a tricky operation.

There were only 4 bridge straights, it was a double track oval.

As it turned out, we only set the layout up a couple of times before it was dismantled.


GG..

I like the wedge idea...
 

Dragon Trainer
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QUOTE (lmsboy @ 23 Oct 2013, 20:22) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Very nice Dave, well done. To complete the picture at the exhibition, you need to be properly attired of course, tweed suit obligatory, pipe optional...
(Hornbyguide.com)

have a good time

Hi Gavin.

That's the "Series 3" Track Train Set Box Top picture. ( I think it is one I supplied to the Hornbygude as well...
) C1958-1962

Here is a couple of "Standard" Track pictures...



Very early 1950s. Spot the roller pick up Princess Locos! The buildings are the original "mock-ups"!"



Later 1950s...with the first Series buildings...

A special for those who wonder what the original Rovex track was like...





Brass rails, and "Non-Universal". The sections can be joined only one way around. Fine for a simple train set oval, but not so good for a "system"!

Tri-ang re-tooled the track to make it "Universal" (It can be joined any way around), the original name for "Standard" track. It was known as Universal, then plain Tri-ang Track, until Series 3 was released in 1958, when the name "Standard" was introduced....
 

Dragon Trainer
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QUOTE (rb277170 @ 28 Oct 2013, 18:56) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Yes takes me back to the great days of the mid 60s when my Mum and Gran took me to lewis's in Glasgow to see Santa, this was followed by a visit to their toy department where there was a Triang display layout. Just like yours although I think using super 4 track by then. I remember one circuit was at a higher level. Probably relatively simple but to a wee boy it seemed huge. Your layout just brings these memories back. Thanks for that

My first train was the Triang Freightmaster delivered by Santa in 1965. swiftly followed by a Jinty and in 1966 Santa arrived with the Triang AL1 electric, because it looked like these new electric trains around Glasgow(well it was the same colour!). Hours were spent browsing Triang-Hornby catalogues,looking at layouts and marvelling that someone could have such a large layout. I still run the old trains on my layout although the AL1 is pretty knackered.

Thanks for bringing it back

Russell, wallowing in nostalgia

Hi Russel...

Here is something I think you may like...





Tri-ang Railways RS.51 "Freightmaster" Train Set...1965 version!
 
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