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If your are in Melbourne and have nothing to do on the weekend it is well worth a visit to the Australian Railway Historical Society Railway Museum. They have an excellent collection of locomotives, wagons and coaches from all eras and you can climb on board most of them for a good look around. I was pleasantly surprised by how much they had their and was well impressed.

Here are some pictures of what was on offer.








X36 Mainline goods loco


D2604 Beyer Peacock Light passenger loco




N432 Light lines goods loco






R704 Mainline passenger loco






B83 Diesel Electric


S306 Diesel electric mainline loco




Australian Standard Garratt










H220 Heavy goods. Heaviest VR loco (260 tons)



They have website at ARHS Museum

Nearby there is also Science works where they have a collection of steam traction engines, lorries and the like which they occaisionally wheel out. These are pretty good too.









 

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Very impressive collection. Were the pcitures taken on an open day or is that how their stock is normally displayed? In northern ireland we have to keep all our preserved items indoors except for special events!

Next time I'm passing I'll have to have a look....

Rob
 

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The ARHS museum is open every weekend and also public holidays. They are just left out in the open and some of them are corroding. There isn't nearly as much rain here so it's not as much of an issue as it is at home in the UK, however it would be good to see a roof over them. Unfortunately it would need someone to pay for it and I don't think the museum would generate that much revenue to pay. Shame as they have an excellent collection.
 

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Nice set of pic's thanks Neil.

I do like the way you can see the influence of different countries in the locomotives.

Be nice to see some of those in steam again.
 

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QUOTE (dbclass50 @ 14 Apr 2008, 14:30) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Nice set of pic's thanks Neil.

I do like the way you can see the influence of different countries in the locomotives.

Be nice to see some of those in steam again.

**Nice piccies Neil - its a good place and I visited several times while I lived on the east Coast.
We have a similar museum here in Perth... fortunately.... with a roof!

WA railways are a real mix - 3'6 gauge historically, now all but the suburban electrics are standard gauge.

Originally UK and NZ influenced for sourcing for loco's, (The suburb with the railway worshops was called midland - that should give a good hint) but now mostly big grain trains and Iron ore trains - the latter with GE and GM's largest loco's hauling absolutely HUGE trains of Iron ore more than a KM long - and they have just started a plan to totally automate these trains - from loading to discharge and the journey in between.

Hundreds of thousands of tons, half a dozen AC6000's, travelling hundreds of KM from loading to port and not one human on the train! Eventually....All to be controlled by a pimply office worker with a joystick in a dark room somewhere....

This happening as they cannot get enough engine drivers to work for them - they just announced a $20,000 per driver annual bonus just for staying on the job - per year for 5 years minimum - this is on top of a seriously BIG (I believe $100,000k+) salary.

Any list memebrs who are train drivers out there that need a job where it is always warm :) :) :) ......OK, hot (but the cabs are air conditioned, and between work sessions, you can live in Perth and be flown to work and back at the company cost too).

Richard
 

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QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 14 Apr 2008, 09:12) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>This happening as they cannot get enough engine drivers to work for them - they just announced a $20,000 per driver annual bonus just for staying on the job - per year for 5 years minimum - this is on top of a seriously BIG (I believe $100,000k+) salary.

Richard

Pity I'm too old - I'd be on the next flight out & the warm dry climate would do wonders for Maggies bones !

(I'd have to show Dave how to operate SL first though !)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 14 Apr 2008, 18:12) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>**Nice piccies Neil - its a good place and I visited several times while I lived on the east Coast.
We have a similar museum here in Perth... fortunately.... with a roof!

This happening as they cannot get enough engine drivers to work for them - they just announced a $20,000 per driver annual bonus just for staying on the job - per year for 5 years minimum - this is on top of a seriously BIG (I believe $100,000k+) salary.

Any list memebrs who are train drivers out there that need a job where it is always warm :) :) :) ......OK, hot (but the cabs are air conditioned, and between work sessions, you can live in Perth and be flown to work and back at the company cost too).

Richard
Do you think they would be prepared to train people to do it? For that kind of money I'd start tommorow!
Not sure about living in Perth though.
 

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QUOTE (neil_s_wood @ 15 Apr 2008, 07:44) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Do you think they would be prepared to train people to do it? For that kind of money I'd start tommorow!
Not sure about living in Perth though.

It does sound tempting, doesn't it.

Going back to the original topic (some good pics there, BTW) it is quite a few years since I last visited Newport for the museum. I seem to recall there was an interesting O gauge tinplate-style layout there too. Corrosion was a bit of a problem onsome of the exhibits. Also noticeable was the fading evident on the sunny side of some exhibits, most notably the wooden Tait/swing door electric coach.

For those intending to visit Australia, I can also recommend the Port Adelaide Museum in South Australia, which has the advantage of being under cover as well. South Australia has an interesting railway heritage with all three gauges present - 5' 3" Victorian gauge, Standard gauge from NSW, WA and also now, Victoria, and 3' 6", shared with Western Australia and the Northern Territory (and Queensland and Tasmania but with no direct links to those systems). I had the privilege of visiting the Adelaide facility when the British Railway Modellers of Australia (BRMA) South Australian members hosted the Annual Convention last year.

Those who drop in to Melbourne, Victoria are welcome to drop me a PM and we can try to get together to host some railway related activities, given enough notice.
 

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QUOTE (dbclass50 @ 14 Apr 2008, 10:07) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>(I'd have to show Dave how to operate SL first though !)

Steady - we've only shown it for the past 2 years!

Excellent photos Neil, I reckon a few UK lines wouldn't mind some of them in their line ups.

Regards
 

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QUOTE (SRman @ 15 Apr 2008, 17:22) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>For those intending to visit Australia, I can also recommend the Port Adelaide Museum in South Australia, which has the advantage of being under cover as well. South Australia has an interesting railway heritage with all three gauges present - 5' 3" Victorian gauge, Standard gauge from NSW, WA and also now, Victoria, and 3' 6", shared with Western Australia and the Northern Territory (and Queensland and Tasmania but with no direct links to those systems). I had the privilege of visiting the Adelaide facility when the British Railway Modellers of Australia (BRMA) South Australian members hosted the Annual Convention last year.

Those who drop in to Melbourne, Victoria are welcome to drop me a PM and we can try to get together to host some railway related activities, given enough notice.
Shame I missed that, still one more reason to go back to Adelaide.
 
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