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.....but a beautiful example to weather, specially take notice of the color of the trucks/bogies.

Baykal
 

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Now THERE is a model weathering project if ever i saw one. anyone fancy the challenge ? lol
 

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Chief mouser
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There used to be another one in a similar condition at Dagenham.

Regards
 

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on the subject of weathering, I really can't bring myself to do it on my new locos - when I look back at the mess I made as a youngster with weathering attempts, I just have to imagine my engines are kept ex-works!
 

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That's fine mate not everyone want's to weather their prize loco's. I don't blame you although I have weathered some of my loco's. (look at my signature pic of my 37!!). And not an airbrush in sight!!


Kind regards

Paul
 

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QUOTE on the subject of weathering, I really can't bring myself to do it on my new locos - when I look back at the mess I made as a youngster with weathering attempts, I just have to imagine my engines are kept ex-works!

even ex-works, weathering, as we call it, is present.....a lot of 'weathering' is really about changing the colour of the materials the model is made out of, to more accurately represent the colour of the original's material...for example, coupling rods and wheel treads?

to me, much of what we call 'weathering', is actually about hiliting details which remain discrete on the pristine model.

for example, check out one's pristine tender underframe?

the mass of moulded detail remains hidden, ie disguised or camouflaged, by the uniform [dark?] colour of the whole underframe.

SOme VERY subtle dry brushing...colour of choice, of course.....over this subdued detail really brings it to life...without actually 'ruining' the overall finish.....as an example.

If one is concerned about commiting inexorably to creating a mess.....why not try using dry powder weathering techniques...simply to enhance the model.

this can be achieved by using simple chalks, powder being created by rubbing on a strip of sandpaper....and borrow the wife's [or someone else's wife's] big makeup brush, dabbled into the chalk dust and flicked generally over the model.

If the effect isn't liked, then simply blow or rub off.

one is really only trying to get the colour into the cornesrs and crannies......but it's amazing how many details like rivets one finds on one's model, which one hadn't noticed before?

As in all things modelling, it's about practice.....whether making perfect or not is debatable.....try techniques out on a cheap wagon first? [of course, if your efforts prove truly rewarding, one is then faced with the fact that one's cheapo wagon then becomes one's pride and joy...instead of one's expensive loco..such is the way of things?]
 
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