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DT
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Can anyone who has done it please give some advice on weathering weathering Metcalfe models.

I now have a few of these kits that I'm slowly putting together.

I have some for the middle-ground of the layout and one or two for the back-ground. One even in N-Scale to get some forced perspective. How can I merge them into the far-back and backdrop?
 

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Chief mouser
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QUOTE (Doug @ 15 Feb 2007, 12:26) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>How can I merge them into the far-back and backdrop?

Hi Doug,

In my opinion it rather depends on the type of scenic development you are planning, I assume you are talking about rural surrondings? Advice on this would help.

Regards

John
 

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You could try boot polish Doug but it dos'nt work

You need to fade the paint work a bit, but not too much try some weathering powders that way you retain the shape but fade them a bit. Trust me I'm doing water colours at college to learn to paint back scenes.
 

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i have used derwent pastel pencils colours ivory black n french gray.
just shade on card wet finger rub over colour
works well and looks good .
 

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I weathered my shops with artists pastels and cheap acrylic paints. Dark green down near ground level, a bit on the rooftops and on the shady side of the bay windows, mucky blackish brown on the pavers and black around the chimneys and on the rooftops. I damaged the surface very slightly with paint that was too wet.
Mike
 

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I use watercolours, artists quality. Most of the earth colours are called 'sedimenting' as opposed to 'staining'. Any reputable art shop will help you out, or Windsor and Newton do a chart showing which are non-staining. The point is that you can mix up, wipe on quickly with a soft brush and still wipe off quickly if it's not right.
A good colour for dulling down card models is 'Naples Yellow' , heavily sedimenting with good covering power which does the job beautifully, much like the plastic card chaps use an air brush with a grime colour. The most important thing to remember is only wipe once/twice with the brush and allow to dry between coats. I think acrylics are often too dense, and stain almost immediately.



Texture can be added by carefully(new blade) cutting out the very top layer of the card in small brick areas and touching up with watercolour eg burnt umber, raw sienna and indian red. Some Payne's Grey is a useful colour, but does stain, so caution! It has blue in it, so mixed thickly with the Naples yellow gives a useful 'old moss' effect I have used on the roof in the piccy above. The little bits you cut out can be stuck back somewhere else to be 'sticky-out' bits. Cut top layer of paper on the lower and side edges of some tiles/slates and tease them up a little. Just look at buildings in grimy places and copy the runs of dirt.water etc
While your at the art shop, buy a waterproof black ink 0.5mm felt tip to make 'gaps' between odd tiles and ridge tiles, and, this is a goody...draw a fine line under any protruding horizontal element that would throw a shadow at midday. or around your cut out bricks, cut out tiles etc to show where the water has got in and attracted dirt.

To make dented/bent areas, moisten with 50/50 water PVA in the appropriate area and allow plenty of time to soak in, then deform as needed, and allow to dry. The PVA stops it bending back out with consequent local changes of humidity. (Eg the dropped slate/gutter area in the lower piccy)

I then preserve my finish by spraying lightly with mat pastel fixing agent (varnish like stuff, again from an art shop)

Hope some of this helps, and that I've not been guilty of an egg sucking lesson!
 

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>that I've not been guilty of an egg sucking lesson!
Not to me. I am particularly impressed by the foundations of that goods shed


David
 

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David, Mike,
Thank you for your kind remarks above.

Doug,

I am sorry I just charged off without addressing the 'blend into background' bit. Bright, firm, warm solid colours come to the front in the human eye...it's how we distinguish the nearest threat and run like b$^^£$y! Examples would be Constable's 'Haywain' where your eye is continually dragged back to the centre of the composition by the red feed sack on the horse' neck or the red waistcoat of the shepherd boy in his 'Cornfield' which draws your eye back to the front left corner and hence up again through the tree above him. So keep background objects pale, and in other than primary colours.
I don't have the answer though I too will have this problem even though my layout in build will only be 1'-8" deep. Having given the matter some thought, I would suggest that you experiment with a spray can of matt medium grey applied very lightly all over (gulp, what a brave thing to do!!!) and if the buildings are in a rural/green location then an equally light spray of matt olive green over the lower third. Perhaps some test pieces of brick paper cards treated and laid in the approximate places would help. Lighting, i.e. not letting them cast a shadow on the backdrops, will be important too, I'm sure. I'd be interested in hearing/seeing your results.
Good luck.
 
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