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Hi. I am keen to do some weathering on some of my locos and wagons. I tried before with some powder stuff that my local model shop sold me, but you could rub it off with your hands!

I remember reading in one of the mags a few years ago about a type of spray you can get. Is that still around?

Are there any tips anyone can give me. I'll practice on an old wagon first.
 

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I usually prefer very thin very weak washes of enamel paint - thinned to the point where it's more like tinted white spirit..

I think any use of a spray can for weathering would probably disasterously overapply the paint. People do use airbrushes for weathering - but that's a different thing altogether , and decent airbrushes are not cheap at all
 

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Scott hi and welcome to MRF.

Practicing on old wagons is a good idea.

I use water based acrylic paints mostly in weathering my loco's and rolling stock. Water color brushes from No's 0 to 6 .
Lots of different paint brands available in the market. I use "Vallejo" paints. "Humbrol" also is another choice.

I am not too keen on sprays and air brushing which needs alot of practice and mastering.

Powders are also used and you have accidentally discovered that rubbing the powders with your finger tips can also be a method . The best brush is your finger tips. The powder gets into the crevices and the excess rubbed off giving a very nice effect depending on the color you have used. Some use spray fixative varnishes but I do not prefer these.

To be honest, there are no rules in weathering and its up to alot of practice, skill and mostly imagination .

Check :

http://modeltrainsweathered.com/index.htm

write : username:mtw
password :enter

Good luck, would like to see the results.

Baykal
 

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Scott....ground pastels and other brands of weathering powders usually can benefit from an application sprayed-on clear matt fixative. Haveing said that, there are a couple of things to add....some weathering powders have a fixative added to them that help the powder adhere to the model.....Bragdons Weathering Powders is one such that I use, and it is an excellent product..and it doesn't fall off. But powders tend to pick-up fingerprints nonetheless so I always overspray with ModelMaster #1260 Dull Cote Flat Lacquer Overcoat. I believe Humbrol makes a similar product, but haveing never used it I can't comment on its quality. The Dull Cote works great though.
One other thing...the spray tends to tone down the colour pf the powder...if you find its toned the colour down too much just repowder and respray until it has the colour/tone you are happy with.
I should think that you can find these products in the UK.
Finally...I have no connection or financial interest in the companies or products I've mentioned here...just a satisfied customer.

Cheers
Gene
 

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QUOTE (Scott Turner @ 22 Oct 2008, 00:55) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi. I am keen to do some weathering on some of my locos and wagons. I tried before with some powder stuff that my local model shop sold me, but you could rub it off with your hands!

I remember reading in one of the mags a few years ago about a type of spray you can get. Is that still around?

Are there any tips anyone can give me. I'll practice on an old wagon first.

***Weathering is a multi stage thing, and can't be done well with a simple spray. Airbrush weathering as is done by hornby and bachmann looks like a model thats been airbrush weathered - ie not very realistice - there is too much "sameness" about it.

For example weathering wheels and rods or brake gear is a mixture of matt and glossy stuff (dirt and oils) in different places. Rust is different on a cabside to a firebox (the high heat changes the rust colour as it does around exhausts or hot spots on diesels). ends of wagons are more likely to have dirt and grunge splashes thrown by the wheels where sides are likely to pick up track dirt and brake shoe dust. Isides will have much from loads + rust & shiny or polished metal parts where the load wears whereas outsides will have wear + rust plus less of the "load muck".

everyone has their own approach and all are valid, but here are a few comments:

Ebaykal did a few posts on weathering of one of his loco's a while ago with images of his loco and the prototype - his work was really excellent so its worth searching MRF for it and looking closely at what he did.

Then, before you start....

First find a prototype thats weathered as you want your wagon/loco etc to be. This is important as the type of weathering is different on different items, and on each item, the weathering will depend on the purpose of the part being weathered... You need to really look at the pictures carefully and do what you really see in the picture, not what you "think you see".

then think about this as a step by step routine...

first brush weathering with paint as per ebaykals comment. you can add depth and texture by using talcum powder (by dabbing it onto wet paint with a brush then ading a tiny bit more paint) to build up gunge levels here - important on anywhere where lots of oil and dusty muck abounds such as on a steam loco chassis etc....

Then perhaps cautious washes of diluted paint to tone things down a wee bit and blend

then powders. I don't like clear coats over powders at all as it gives a sameness to the texture of everything that destroys the reality... If powders are added after a very diluted clear airbrushing or hand brushing with very diluted clear matt varnish (in both cases more than 50% thinners) and you start to apply powders carefully after its started to "tack" with a very soft brush you will preserve some of the texture differences that are really important to a realistic finish

finally dry brushing of pipework and areas of the loco that are wiped or handled a lot (on the prototype, not the model) will highlight some things better. (dry brushing means taking a totally clean & dry (and perhaps slightly stiffer than usual) paintbrush, putting very, very little paint on the tip of the bristles then wiping most of it off on newspaper or lint free tissues.... then flicking the tip of the brush (with almost no pressure) back and forth across raised details to add the tinyest bit of colour to them to create highlights)

finally, a weathered loco shouldn't be handled too much.

Subtle high quality weathering depends on texture differences at least as much as colour, and just like the no-no of a clear coat over powders, handling wrongly will change the texture of the surfaces. ( So in fact back to the start of your first post... its not the powders needing fixing thats the problem - its the careless fingers that need training
).

Richard
 

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All the above comments are superb in the approach to weathering,

After applying washes i do drybrush another excellent way of bringing out detail ...... with practice its amazing just how much detail there can be on a wagon/loco.
 

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QUOTE (Scott Turner @ 21 Oct 2008, 16:55) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi. I am keen to do some weathering on some of my locos and wagons. I tried before with some powder stuff that my local model shop sold me, but you could rub it off with your hands!

I remember reading in one of the mags a few years ago about a type of spray you can get. Is that still around?

Are there any tips anyone can give me. I'll practice on an old wagon first.

Hi Scott

With Christmas coming put "The Art of Weathering" by Martyn Welch (Wild Swan publications) on your list. This is the bible for all weathering by railway modellers. If it is out of print, second hand copies may be available at exhibitions.

Dave
 

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I have always wanted to weather some locos and rolling stock and reading this thread with all the advice given has made up my mind to give it a try. What is the best way to get the weathering off as I have not many scrap pieces for practice. Could I do a coat of primer and start again. Alan
 

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QUOTE (rooke @ 23 Oct 2008, 05:17) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I have always wanted to weather some locos and rolling stock and reading this thread with all the advice given has made up my mind to give it a try. What is the best way to get the weathering off as I have not many scrap pieces for practice. Could I do a coat of primer and start again. Alan

***Practice on things other than trains - for example when i wanted to teach myself to airbrush, I practiced on coke cans, odd shaped plastic bottles etc... There are probably lots of things due for the bin that will give U a surface to practice on

Richard
 

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I think that the main reason people don't weather their stock is because they look at some of the weathering that is shown on the net and IMHO it is rather extreme. For me weathering is doing two things, firstly it is dulling down the plastic finish and secondly to make it look dirty and used.

Heavily rusted US outline box cars get lots of attention but that IMHO is not the norm. There is a difference between run down and condemned stock. Some of the weathering jobs I have seen while well done look indifferent to me because I think the stock should be condemned rather than running in trains.

Personally I use powder paint for weathering. I may start using my air brush one day, But I get the results I want with the powder paint. When the paint drops off the wagons it adds to the roadbed. I don't pick up my stock very often so I don't need to use any fixers. There is enough moisture in the air for it to stick to the plastic.

I started off by playing with a cheap wagon and then moved on to my stock. For me the hard part was understanding how dirt accumulates and how the weather washes it into the appropriate places.
 

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QUOTE (rooke @ 22 Oct 2008, 22:17) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I have always wanted to weather some locos and rolling stock and reading this thread with all the advice given has made up my mind to give it a try. What is the best way to get the weathering off as I have not many scrap pieces for practice. Could I do a coat of primer and start again. Alan

HI Alan
The way i use to get paint off my models is to use a small amount of caustic soda in a bowl mixed in with water (put the soda into the water NOT the other way round).
I would advise doing it first on an old loco body etc before trying it on something you want to keep nice.
It isn't too difficult but please remember to wear rubber gloves when using this stuff.

This is what you do in a stage by stage situation.
1, find a suitable bowl that the loco/wagon etc will be able to be imursed in.
2, put some warm water in the bowl enough to cover subject.
3, pour a little of the caustic soda into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon or similar.
4, then you can now put the subject into the bowl and i normally leave overnight.
5, with an old toothbrush and with my rubber gloves on i will then start to scrub lightly on the bodywork and watch the paint just fall off.
6, i would then wash the subject off with some clean warm water and leave to dry.

I have done this several times myself and it works very well and in most cases never even takes the printed detail off from the model that the manufacturer has put on.
I hope this really helps you Alan and please let me know if you do it and it works for you.

Kind regards
Paul
 

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That 37 in your signature looks brilliant.


David
 

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QUOTE (dwb @ 25 Oct 2008, 12:17) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>That 37 in your signature looks brilliant.


David

Many thanks David thats very kind of you. I weathered that loco entirely by drybrushing with enamels (I do military modelling aswell).
I hardly ever use pastels or weathering powders except on my tanks. Some of the streaks i do by diluting the paint that i have already put on the loco and brush down as like the rain would go.

Kind regards and thanks again for your kind comments

Paul
 

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QUOTE (Lancashire Fusilier @ 25 Oct 2008, 15:46) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Where does one procure caustic soda dare I ask? Particularly in the Antipodes that is!

Hi all i know is that in England you can get it from Wilkinsons home and garden hardware shops. You could try hardware stores where you are or possibly a pharmacy.


Hope this helps

Paul
 

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Paul, Thanks for that. I've had my first go at weathering, need more practice. so your caustic soda remedy will be getting an airing shortly. Many thanks. Alan
 

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QUOTE (Brian Considine @ 26 Oct 2008, 06:54) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I second that - very nice "in service look".

No problem chaps after all that what this forum is all about. Helping each other.

Hope it works well for you Alan just take care doing it.

Paul
 

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Really recomend the art of weathering book as mentioned earlier, I've also just got a new model rail dvd called the weathering expert, thats also great and there's a bit at the start using tamiya weathering pigments.
dvd's available from www.telerail.co.uk
 

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QUOTE (steve67 @ 26 Oct 2008, 17:29) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Really recomend the art of weathering book as mentioned earlier, I've also just got a new model rail dvd called the weathering expert, thats also great and there's a bit at the start using tamiya weathering pigments.
dvd's available from www.telerail.co.uk

Hi Steve. Would that DVD be the Model Rail expert series on the art of weathering by any chance?. I also have it and i do think it is very good but most of the time i can be well on my way to finishing a side of a loco by the time i have got the airbrush out and thinned and mixed the paint etc. Airbrushing certainly does take a lot of practice but still worth the effort. And besides i believe in people using any way that they feel most confident in.

Kind regards
Paul
 
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