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age old question. what guage. planing to build a layout based on prototype. something on the woodhead route. likebiulding kits, so most of my stock will be kit built. thing is I just seem to keep going round in circles. O gauge, kits are a pleasure to build in this gauge. detail you can achive is fantastic. size for realistic running and cost are it's downfall. OO gauge kits bit more fiddly but can still achieve good standard of detail. realistic length trains can be run. In the space available will I be able to have a good sized scenic area. N gauge. never built a kit in this scale, but can imagine it to be very fiddly. would be able to achieve a almost exact replica in space available. space i should have available estimated to be approx 17ft x 8ft once loft is converted. as you can see pro's and con's for each scale.

thanks in advance
 

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DT
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You've answered your own question


OO gauge is the compromise and gives most bang for the buck.

I too think HO/OO is too fiddly, but I run it as I like to run my trains (indoors) and at HO/OO scale, I have just about enough space for a nice layout.

You will now certainly hear from the N gauge guys who will evangelise N and likewise perhaps an O gauger or two who will swear by that scale
 

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QUOTE (never upright @ 26 Mar 2009, 14:35) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>age old question. what guage. planing to build a layout based on prototype. something on the woodhead route. likebiulding kits, so most of my stock will be kit built. thing is I just seem to keep going round in circles. O gauge, kits are a pleasure to build in this gauge. detail you can achive is fantastic. size for realistic running and cost are it's downfall. OO gauge kits bit more fiddly but can still achieve good standard of detail. realistic length trains can be run. In the space available will I be able to have a good sized scenic area. N gauge. never built a kit in this scale, but can imagine it to be very fiddly. would be able to achieve a almost exact replica in space available. space i should have available estimated to be approx 17ft x 8ft once loft is converted. as you can see pro's and con's for each scale.

thanks in advance

Hello.
17ft x 8ft is a nice size for one or two people at home. With this size you could have a nice layout in OO or O gauge. You could have an entire city in N gauge but unless your a workaholic or there are several people working on the layout you might never finish it because you might tire of it long before you ever get near the end of it. I don't live in the UK so I'm not familiar with the route you are thinking of modelling but I would say that if you wanted more than just a station you're best bet would be OO gauge. You would get a station or two + some nice scenic modelling into 17ft x 8ft.
I model in OO gauge myself & i find that what I have 21ft x 9ft is enough for one person even though my partner also takes an interest & paints the backgrounds etc. I hope it takes off for you & if there is any information you require there are plenty of people on here only too willing to help.
 

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If intending to build a 'model of a railway'....then much indeed will be scratchbuilt, will it not?
The Woodhead line is,I believe, well served by kits in N gauge...particularly locos...[EM1 kit?]

Of course, OOgauge has the infamous Tri-ang EM2....as well as all those left-field kits using resin, etc...

but why OO?

If attempting to model the prototype, why not go one step further and use EM or P4?

Sadly, as modellers we all seem locked into the ''big 3'..namely, N, OO and O.

But there ARE other options...with magnificent backup in one case...so what about 3 mm scale? http://www.3mmsociety.org.uk/

nicely halfway between OO and N?

Of course, the other option is the real scratch [and kit!]builder's route, and that's S scale........between OO and O in size

all depends on one's modelling 'bent'?
 

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Hi there 'always horizontal'.

I could, as has been suggested, wax lyrical about N Gauge but at the end of the day it's down to a combination of what you set out to achieve, the space you have available and, not to be under-estimated, a steady hand and good eye-sight.

I too would model 00 if I had enough space to run prototypical length trains through rolling country-side, but I don't, so since this is my own aim, I have chosen N Gauge as being the only way to achieve this in the space available. Having said that, however, the range of RTR locos and rolling stock now available in N Gauge is pretty extensive and covers just about every region and era you could think of. The quality and level of detail are, I would estimate, about the same as was available in 00 only 5 or 6 years ago. DCC is possible with most N Gauge locos though built-in sound is, I think, as yet only available in American and Continental RTR models. It may be possible to retro-fit sound into the diesels/electrics and some of the larger British outline steam locos but for the smaller ones, forget it !! Kit building in N Gauge is very fiddly and I have, so far, restricted myself to maikng up some small freight wagons. I don't think I would have either the eye-sight or steady hands necessary to build a loco in this scale.

Interesting suggestion from Alastair about 3mm scale though from what I understand you will need to be prepared to build not only the locos and rolling stock but also your own track and points.

If I had had the space you have I think I would have gone for 00, not just for it's ease of working on but for the quality of current RTR models and their in-built sound capabilities.

Good luck with your deliberations and keep us posted whichever way you go.
 
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