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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read a lot of UK articles about making scenery and they often describe techniques using Polyfilla but I live in the US and there is nothing called Polyfilla. Anyone know what Polyfilla actually is or what the Home Depot equivalent is?
 

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Hi TD
Polyfilla is little more than a packet of powered plaster which has soem plastisizer in it and is mixed with water. Its real use is filling holes etc in plastrered walls.
Pollyfilla
 

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Yes it's more like spackle which can be vinyl or cellulose. The vinyl stuff is newer. You can get tons of different kinds at Home Depot. Hydrocal is a plaster. Each work fine and I use both. I'll use hydrocal for basic terrain and rocks and I'll fill it with spackle especially if I want strata.

America may seem like a cultural wasteland at times but we do have large well supplied hardware stores.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So let me see if I've got this right

The stuff at Home Depot called "Spackle" is like Polyfilla (i.e. plaster with plastisizer)
Hydrocal (can you get it at HD?) is just plaster.

So then what is "Lightweight Spackle", it seems nothing like plaster although it does seem similar to Woodland Scenics Foam Putty?

And then what is Woodland Scenics Lightweight Hydrocal? How can you make plaster lighter without making it out of something else?
 

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Lightweight Spackle is probably Vinyl Spackle and yes it's like the Woodland scenics stuff but maybe more like flex paste. I think the light-weight plaster is based on the chemical formula that results when dry to be less dense and therefore lighter. Plaster can weigh a ton so lightweight is better.

Go to the store and get some small packages and try the stuff. Each has it's merits and you need to try it out for yourself. Don't depend too much on what we say. You might find yourself comfortable with something completely different. With hydrocal you can add pigment. With spackle you can trowel in details.

It's like working with any materials, try it out on a small diorama. I've done a lot of scenery in my time but when I get to that point with my latest project I'll try some new stuff on small bits. Don't spend a lot of money buying large quantities yet.
 

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I've even used Hydrocal mixed with Dental casting powder. The Hydrocal increases the setting time. Dental casting powder for those who havn't experienced it sets quick and becomes as stong as concrete!. If you mix large quanties it sets as you mix it. I once did some curved platform tops with it, thinking I could sand it to a smooth finish. No Way. I ended up using a sharp chisel to get the finish I wanted!!!!. There's no big deal with Polycell, polyfilla, and I'm sure by now you have the general idea.
 

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QUOTE (Dennis David @ 1 Sep 2006, 10:39) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I like the plastic impregnated gause that Woodland Scenics makes. It's expensive but really easy to use. You can buy similiar products in bulk that are a lot cheaper. Mixing powder except to cast rocks is too much work for me.

I may use this stuff next time around. Last layout I used paper mache over chicken wire. It's good but very time consuming and I have even less time now than I did then. I wont be using chicken wire again either as it's a bugger to remove or trim. I have a stock pile of polystyrene to use instead.
 

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Bundle up newspaper, use making tape to keep it in place and place the gauze over it. When you're ready I'll look for the URL of the bulk stuff though it might be too expensive to ship as it comes in a big container. Then I'll use spackle to fill in spots or attach rock castings. I even taught my son to use it on his school project over the phone while I was away on business. My wife says his turned out better than mine.


The drawback is it's expensive and you really can't stain it. But it's light, quick, easy and can be trimmed with shears.
 
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