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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What type of buildings do you use on your layout?
Card kit buildings (eg Superquick, Metcalfe)5119.25%
Plastic kit buildings (eg Dapol, Hornby, Faller)2810.57%
Resin ready built buildings (eg Skaledale)2710.19%
Scratchbuilt3513.21%
A mixture of different types12446.79%
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Here is an opportunity for the experienced modellers among us to offer some advice to those who are just starting out and planning of their brand new layout.

When it comes to buildings modellers have their preferences.

Card kits are printed with lots of fine detail, look colourful, come with weathered effects, take 2-3 hours to construct, and are ideal for permanent layouts.

Plastic kits often are self coloured, have texture, very often require some painting, but tend to be durable for those who move buildings around a lot. They are a must for those structures based on a framework.

Resin buildings are colourful, have texture and look lived in, can be used indoors or out, and can be used straight out of the box. A recent innovation.

Scratchbuilt buildings are unique, require modelling skills, take a lot of time and permit prototype buildings to be constructed.

Buildings are an important element of any layout.

Which modelling material do you predominantly use and why?

I personally have used all three materials in the same layout and scratchbuilt but a lot of modellers don't like doing this as they claim that the combination of different textures and finishes does not look right. What I tend to do is keep like textures together so I might have a village scene in one area with Skaledale and a town scene elsewhere with card, and an industrial scene elsewhere with plastic.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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I stick with plastic by Faller, Kibri, Volmer, etc. But you left out an important category which may not be as common in the UK called Craftsman Kits which come with laser cut wood and white metal details.

Fine Scale Miniatures are a leading example but there are others that make much simpler kits.



Dexter's Dead End $280 - Obviously not a kit for the faint hearted.
 

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What beautiful models, I can see where the price comes from. Must admit I wouldn't mind having a go at one of them.
Forgot to mention that I do most of my scratchbuilding with card and have done so for many years. I find I can reproduce most building material, wood, steel, bricks, concrete etc.
 

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Kit contents:

9521 planks of 1:87 scale wood

1456 1:87 scale bricks

256 1:87 scale panes of glass

...



I'm sure that these are mostly raw material kits where you do allot of building. You could scratch build these if you get your techniques right and get hold of some good source material.
 

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I have several buildings on my layout in plastic and skaledale best for durability in comparison to card that seem to show as unreal and easily damaged.
I personally prefer Skaledale models though in the past choice of difference in types of buildings can be limited - on a small layout just about right.
Skaledale models have see through windows - a bonus if one wishes to furnish the inners and electric lighting. Buildings made of resin compound to me are ugly as all windows amd doors are just painted on the outer surfaces.
 

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I model in N mainly and I have scratch built most buildings with slaters card and a vivid imagination+modellers licience!
I still think that 'one' can get very bogged down with tedious exactness, if it looks right and you enjoy it then it's fine.

I have used the computer to mock up buildings using basic shapes and this can really help. Publisher is a great tool for this, using the 'brick' pattern fill and the status bar to measure your shapes height etc. I think its really useful. Especially if you're not completely steady with a ruler/ eyesight.

BUT....

Remember the great three little rules applied to 'The Shed' O gauge exhibition layout -

1) It's my layout

2) Discussions are welcome

3) In case of inaccuracies, defects and faults, please refer to 1)

A mantra for us all!?

Jules
 

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I model both card and also Linka the plaster system.

Linka system can be found at www.linkaworld.com

It creates great looking buildings in brick or stone although I admit that the process of moulding in preparation for building can be a bit tedious

Jim
 

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I scratchbuild using mostly card and paper, but do use plasticard for brickwork. The only kitbuilt building on my layout is a Ratio signal box, which will be replaced when I get around to buildinga more apropriate one.
 

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I'm amazed at how many people use card and paper to make buildings. This is very uncommon in the US where we are much more likely to use sheet plastic or wood when we are not building kits.

A couple popular companies that supply our raw materials are:

Northeastern Scale Lumber Company

Plastruct

Builders in Scale

Something else that's getting to be pretty popular is modular kits for building factories of any size. One company that is duing this is Design Preservation Models
 

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On my layout (Still in planning stage - 6ft x 1ft!) i plan on using only a few skaledale buildings time. Reason being is they are very detailed and at the moment i don't have much time to build any of my own.
 

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Although I like to use card kits for buildings, I find that platforms are easilily made from two layers of 9 mm MDF (oddments from my base board) Just construct the platform top, add a slightly smaller base, paint it grey with one of those sample emulsion pots c/w brush, add a white edge and it looks quite authentic, perhaps not quite spot on for the purists but close enough.

Branchie
 

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My layout is based on the architecture of the NER as at York and Newcastle. It is all on a very grand scale and highly repetitive. At an early stage I decided that I would have to develop a system based on cast plaster modules that can be made in relatively large quantities from my own mould. A bit like Linka I suppose.

The main station walls, supporting the overall roofs, are very repetitive, just a succession of identical panels of brickwork with arches and round windows at high level. There were two master panels made about 8 cms high and 4 cms wide for each side made out of 3 mm ply and plasticard, using arches spplied by Ratio. A latex mould was made from each master and then each mould was used to produce about 30 plaster castings. I also cast the external brick abutments.

The station walls were made from 3 mm ply which was fixed directly to the baseboard with all the doorway openings and windows cut out. The moulded panels were fettled up and checked for size and then glued to the walls side by side taking care to fill the joints with glue that were not covered by abutments. The glue was injected into the joints with a hypodermic needle.

The modelling plaster used was dyed with powder paint and when dry it was painted with Humbrol matt paints.

The finished results can be seen on the LNER Forum at http://www.lner.info/forums/viewtopic.php?t=39

Colombo
 

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Like Branchliner, I too have built my own platforms and to add a further final step after painting to add a coat of matte clear varnish. This ensures a better finish, and a harder final surface against dirt and scratches.
 

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Hi.
I scratchbuild all my buildings as can I can find nothing really to suit early LMS (LNWR) available that would fit in with my layout.
Basically I use plastikard in various thicknesses/finishes painted and weathered.
I have also found that "foamboard", bought from my local artists shop really good for the basics of larger structures like retaining walls.
The platform of my station was a bit of a pain as it is curved-
I ended up building it in situ with balsa.
I also needed a fair bit of dry stone walling and found that the Hornby Skaledale
product really works well when given a good coat of weathering mixture.
Cheers.
pete
 

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Dennis' pictures of magnificent wooden 'kits' sent me looking for others.
I eventually discovered an N Gauge wooden kit by Fides-Mlbert Creations of Montreux, Switzerland. Unfortunately this company doesn't seem to have a web site and information as to where to obtain the kits or the cost proved impossible to find.

I was lucky enough to eventually find just one picture and that's all.

Acknowledgements to J Whitby
 

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It seems that well known N Gauge accesssory producer, PD Marsh, is introducing some laser cut wooden kits to the British market. I haven't yet located a picture, but they do have a "Hints & Tips" section on their Ebay based site. It's more of a description of the manufactured article than a building guide, but nonethless an interesting read.

PD Marsh - laser cut wooden structures
 
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