Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

I have recently decided that I wish my layout run Eastern Region locos of BR, so I tried to see how my Bachmann A1 hauled some trucks about 13 of them, I found they detrailed alot, the trucks are hornby and Bachmann Thomas trucks

my questions really are, that I intend to replace these with realsitic trucks of the period, now see as all my locos have the small couplings similar to Bachmann as that is how Hornby make the couplings on there super detailed locos,

which company trucks should I get Bachmann or Hornby, and could the derailments be down to the trucks being empty and need weight?

I hope that all sort of makes sense

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,202 Posts
hi.......firstly, derailments with a long train of wagons...or indeed, anything.....can be down to a multitude of factors.
such as.....track?
[ie, is the track evenly laid?
how tight are the curves.....are there any S-curves....turnouts..etc....track joints....obstructions [such as the odd raised track pin].....points set the wrong way...all manner of things]

vehicles themselves....?
[wheels...particularly whether they all have even distances apart....back-to-back, etc.....run freely....bogies on coaches able to swivel freely etc]

then there are the individual vehicle weights?
much has been written on the topic of ideal weights for wagons and coaches...I suppose a couple of ounces of extra weight for an ordinary 4-wheel wagon or van...more for a coach, or long wagon...and so on.
Of course, there is also the factor of train make-up [no, not LNER lipstick]....the heaviest of wagons should have been behind the loco, graduating to lighter ones further back down your train....if lightweight wagons were at the front, then the heavier wagons further back will place pressure on the front wagons, causing them to fall off, especially on curves.

so......add a bit of weight to the wagons....stuff sold through Model Rail magasine, called ''Liquid Lead'' is quite useful for placing weight under wagon floors, inside the chassis.

Other wagon issues centre on the type and size of couplings between each vehicle....whilst I suspect nearly all modern proprietary stock will have hook-and-bar couplings of some sort, [unless modified by the owner...in which case, sorting de-railment probs is all grist for the mill].....but these couplings can vary immensely in size, flexibility of side swing, etc, between makers.....creating pressures on the wagons causing de-railments......check the various lengths of hook, for example....see which wagons cause problems with each other....on the tightest curves you have......check out also, S-curves, like those between a crossover pointwork set-up on a double track?
In this instance, settling on one particular make of coupler can help....Bachmann's are about as good as they come with this type.....indeed, I believe most of Bachmann's freight stock surpasses that sold by Hornby...apart from certain exceptions.

Also, make sure that every wheelset has the same distance apart...and spins freely.

If you are set upon creating a realistic model railway, ie have a specific prototype in mind...which you seem to have...then why not take a look at the various chassis parts from the scale kit makers, like Parkside, etc...these are sold separately, for a modest cost, and can be used to correct things like wheelbase, which the big makers can tend to gloss over...no doubt in the interests of costs......bachmann or hornby bodies can be affixed easily.....thus you are well on the way to establishing a wheel and coupling standard, as you can pick and choose, rather than simply having to accept what you are given??

so, to sum up, take a look at couplers,and weights.....especially if you think the trackage is OK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
342 Posts
Standards of build should not be too differant between Bachman and Hornby at least for the more modern wagons so either should run on reasonable trackwork but there are a lot of things which can affect good running as outlined in the above post
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
7,678 Posts
Buy Bachmann if your mention of an A1 means you are a steam era modeller.

Reason one. They are the only company offering an accurate BR 16T mineral wagon. Quarter of a million built in the BR steam ers - it is the definitive vehicle of the period.

Reason two. If planning to use the miniature tension lock, Bachmann's is superior to Hornby's. Best results are obtained by only using one type as Alastairg posted: and if you buy as many 16t minerals as you should it will be your near majority coupler anyway.

Reason three. Most of their steam era wagons are decent models. There are a few to avoid, the midland cattle wagon, and short wheelbase ex-LNE brake are two that spring to mind. But by and large you will get a model if you make a purchase.

Selectively buy Hornby. Recent productions like the Shark, and various other engineers vehicles, are at last to a good standard. They also have in their range some ex-Airfix vehicles like the Lowmac and Stanier brake van which are good models. With the huge old coupler hacked away, and a replacement Bachmann coupler glued on they work well.

Dapol, let's wait and see. Promising to match Bachmann's standard, and a few contemporary wagon releases have been well received. Their older 4W wagons though are pretty dire.

I can both pull and push 60 wagon trains of standard Bachmann 4W wagons on a 30" radius minimum curve, and through any formation of Peco large and medium radius points, with complete reliability. You should be able to obtain equally good results. On smaller radii reliability falls off - I did a lot of experiments to determine that reliability was attained with this train length on my standard of track laying using these points and a 30" minimum radius.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for the comments guys

well my trackwork has gone under some serious work, i.e made the radius much wider the the super detailed locos.

I have them running with an A3 and on the whole they were fine, it was when running with my Bachmann A1 they started derailing all over the place, thats why I was considering Bachmann Wagons
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
If you want to be correct for an A1+ mineral wagons in the early 60s, you could try and buy some vacuum fitted (bauxite) Bachmann iron ore tipplers and a fitted brake van. A train formed of these ran (I think) from High **** to Sheffield on a regular basis.

I have always assumed this was because the train could run at a higher speed along the ECML between just south of Grantham and Retford, and therefore not hold up the expresses. The unfitted iron ore trains to Scunthorpe were routed via Barkston East and Boston, or Lincoln via Honington Junc, and were mainly the preserve of O2, or O1/4 classes.
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
7,678 Posts
That was 'The Aldwarke job' to a steelworks at Aldwarke near Rotheram, a daily ore train loaded from High ****, returning with the previous day empties. Run under class 4 express (fully brake fitted) freight headcode and usually a pacific, sometimes a V2 or 9F turn.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top