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I bought an 00 back to back wheel gauge from C&L Finescale's stand at this weekend's CMRA exhibition in St Albans. I knew I'd got a few wheelsets that were suspect and wanted to check them out. However, all the wheel-sets I've checked so far all seem to be slightly narrow, even on modern RTR locos I know run well!

The gauge is 14.8mm wide (micrometer measurement). A search through the forum has bought up a previous topic Help with dimensions please where the recommended back-to-back dimension is said to be 14.5mm or slightly above. A measurement with an accurate steel rule on the well-running locos indicates these are indeed 14.5mm back-to-back.

Have I got the right gauge? Or do I need to have a word with C&L?

Regards,
John Webb
 

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John, if this is anything to go by http://www.doubleogauge.com/standards/finescalewheels.htm , then 14.8 is OK for FINESCALE, not for your normal Hornby/bachmann trains which are usually around 14.5. Not sure how Finescale & Peco points marry up, I think some shims of brass/styrene are required in check/guard rails to reduce the clearances & stop the fine scale whels from riding up onto the frog point.
 

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***14.8 is OK for fine profile wheels, and MAY be ok with some of the current H & B driving wheels too. I haven't tried it to the width, but as below 14.75 definately works fine.

For my own very fine scale pointwork I use 14.85.... But I actually prefer 14.75 for peco code 75 track for the smoothest running and find it OK with all current wheels. If you have any earlier stuff though, it should probaly be set to 14.5.

Using the widest possible reliable back to back fixes many things and with the "slop" taken out of the wheel to rail relationship, rolling stock seems to run and ride more comfortably on the track (none of the side to side lateral movement that is usually there).

Irrespective of the BTB issue, 10 (any reasonable wheels) to 15 thou (finer wheels) styrene laminated inside Peco guardrails certainly improves tracking.

Richard
 

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The C+L gauge is appropriate for strict OO Finescale , using Gibson and Ultrascale wheels. It is not appropriate for RTR - these should be regarded as being to OO Intermediate/Commercial standards , and the back to back should be 14.4mm . For those who don't have an NMRA gauge to hand , back to back gauges to 14.5mm are readily available and though fractionally wide are an acceptable working subsitute

Peco points , as noted , are a bit coarse for modern models - the flangeway is rather too wide for proper side control, and this can corrected by a thin shim as already described by others

Data sheets for OO standards are available on the Double O Gauge Association website , under the standards section - for modern RTR , you want the sheets marked "OO Intermediate" - not the "OO Finescale" sheets . C+L's gauge relates to the "OO Finescale" sheets

Basically you've got the wrong gauge for your purposes, though C+L might argue you've got the wrong purposes and should replace your chassis with kit built ones from Comet...
 

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Thank you, gentlemen, for your replies. The C&L stand was rather busy, I was in a hurry - and thus didn't think to ask them exactly what dimension the gauge was, although why they couldn't state it on the packet I don't know....
(And the 00 Gauge Society was at the exhibition as well!)

Regards,
John
 

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Yup, the DOGA stand at St Albans did have some of their gauges- I've used them for a while now and certainly they improve running and assist rewheeling- the only prob unless you're very tidy is finding the block when you need it!
Surprising how the wheels do shift, unless you secure them with a dab of superglue when they've been accurately gauged- the replacement Hornby wheels being a friction fit on the axle via a rubber? bush for insulation.
The other assist I've found helpful is that little gadget you twiddle in the axle-boxes - it's half a pointed drill bit, removes irregularities and sets the axle space accurately- can someone remember what it's called? cost about £8 I think...The Bachmann Bullieds in particular benefit from this if you're trying to use Hornby replacement wheels...
In passing, anyone know of a reliable way of uggrading the old Wrenn axleboxes from nylon to metal wheels? just inserting the wheel sets leaves the axleboxes scraping the third rail... Thanks...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE (marshlander @ 15 Jan 2009, 14:50) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>.... In passing, anyone know of a reliable way of uggrading the old Wrenn axleboxes from nylon to metal wheels? just inserting the wheel sets leaves the axleboxes scraping the third rail... Thanks...

I've not tried it myself, but would the 'Top-hat' axle bearings sold by Peco and others fit in the axle boxes? Or is it a matter of getting the right wheel diameter?

Regards,
John Webb
 

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Thanks, John- tried it this weekend and it works- put a speck of blutack on the end of the bearing to hold it in while the axles were being fitted- the point a t which you need three hands! Found the axles quite a tight fit, the axleboxes needed pliering out a tad to get them in but once in they rotate freely. fiddly job! The thing would be to rebuild the chassis, if there weren't a hundred and one other jobs to do... maybe Dapol are doing just that for us all...
Cheers
Bob
 
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