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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the process of replacing old magnets from my old locos.
There are a number of choices in the market.
Mainly there are "neo" (Neodymium) and "super neo" plus old earth type magnets.
Has any of you used and compared the "neo" type and the "super neo"?
What is really the difference with and without the word "super"?

Also, since both "neo" and "super neo" magnets are rather expensive.
The cheapest stream loco I got from Ebay was only 8 pounds which was
a Princess class Triang loco. A single and very small super neo magnet costs
something like that.

I was thinking of re-magnetise old magnets for those cheap locos and only
replace magnets for those expensive stuff. Old magnets always have
holes in them, making it more expensive to replace them, sometimes even
difficult to find an exact match. Maybe re-magnetising is easy and cheaper.
Does anyone know how to re-magnetise old stuff? What is the cost?
 

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I got some neo magnets for my Farish n gauge locos they worked well with the 3 pole motors but were lumpy on the 5 pole . They came from Ebay imported from the States
 

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QUOTE (flygopher @ 6 Jan 2008, 02:49) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I am in the process of replacing old magnets from my old locos.
There are a number of choices in the market.
Mainly there are "neo" (Neodymium) and "super neo" plus old earth type magnets.
Has any of you used and compared the "neo" type and the "super neo"?
What is really the difference with and without the word "super"?

Also, since both "neo" and "super neo" magnets are rather expensive.
The cheapest stream loco I got from Ebay was only 8 pounds which was
a Princess class Triang loco. A single and very small super neo magnet costs
something like that.

I was thinking of re-magnetise old magnets for those cheap locos and only
replace magnets for those expensive stuff. Old magnets always have
holes in them, making it more expensive to replace them, sometimes even
difficult to find an exact match. Maybe re-magnetising is easy and cheaper.
Does anyone know how to re-magnetise old stuff? What is the cost?

***Neo is short for neodymium, a rare earth used for small string magnets. Changing to a NEO magnet will make motor power delivery higher, lower current draw, give smoother running generally.

The difference between "super Neo" and "Neo" is probably nothing much except the name.

You CAN remagnetise the old Ferrite magnets yourself but NOT if you aren't sure what U are doing and also a careful person - the voltage is low enough but the current draw is huge when doing it - burns can happen!

see the attached PDF

If you don;t already own the bits to make the magnetiser it'll cost more than new magnets, so in that case its going to be better to replace with Neo magnets or get a third party with a machine to do it really.

Richard
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hardly to breath when reading the instruction.
Well, I guess I will go to buy a few neo-mag instead of the breave idea
of remagnetising.

Bear in mind, the Ebay price is now higher than others somehow.
I hear the story that Tesco offers car insurances both for online with 10% off
and via phone. The phone quote price is 60 pounds cheaper than online quote.
So do the trains. I saw a brand new Derwent Grange 4-6-0 sold as only 27 pounds in a dept
shop during Jan sale and the same train was sold near the RRP at 60 pounds in Ebay.
I think I am going to a few local model shops to see whether they hold new old
type magnets.
 

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QUOTE (flygopher @ 10 Jan 2008, 05:43) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hardly to breath when reading the instruction.
Well, I guess I will go to buy a few neo-mag instead of the breave idea
of remagnetising.

Bear in mind, the Ebay price is now higher than others somehow.
I hear the story that Tesco offers car insurances both for online with 10% off
and via phone. The phone quote price is 60 pounds cheaper than online quote.
So do the trains. I saw a brand new Derwent Grange 4-6-0 sold as only 27 pounds in a dept
shop during Jan sale and the same train was sold near the RRP at 60 pounds in Ebay.
I think I am going to a few local model shops to see whether they hold new old
type magnets.

***This company may be able to help you.

http://www.modelspares.com/

They are in UK/Burnley

Richard
DCCconcepts
 

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very interesting esp the Mig welder one

So 'ive a Mig welder you mention the output do you mean the thin mig wire .

So you pump out a couple of feet, wind it into a coil, earth the surplus end and flick the switch

I'll have a go on a very weak magnet.
 

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QUOTE (Locomad @ 19 Jan 2008, 09:28) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>very interesting esp the Mig welder one

So 'ive a Mig welder you mention the output do you mean the thin mig wire .

So you pump out a couple of feet, wind it into a coil, earth the surplus end and flick the switch

I'll have a go on a very weak magnet.

***NO - I mean heavy enamelled or insulated copper wire! The coil should have high current handling and be insulated - otherwise it won't make a coil, just a short circuit!. Please - be careful - No offence but the fact you asked that question says "you shouldn't do it".

There is huge energy involved and the cautions I made on the comment are very real. Why not just get the magnet remagnetised by Modelspares - they charge very little for the Service....
 

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QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 19 Jan 2008, 05:04) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>***NO - I mean heavy enamelled or insulated copper wire! The coil should have high current handling and be insulated - otherwise it won't make a coil, just a short circuit!. Please - be careful - No offence but the fact you asked that question says "you shouldn't do it".

There is huge energy involved and the cautions I made on the comment are very real. Why not just get the magnet remagnetised by Modelspares - they charge very little for the Service....

Absolutely do not mess with electricity. You could kill yourself, and for a train set magnet???????????????
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, abosoluately.
They only charge 1.50 per motor and 2.50 P&P regardless the number
of motors. I am not going to risk my finger for a burn or even worse:)
for only 1.5 quids.

Shame they only mag X03/04 motor. I have got an early 80s HST 125 whose engine
is tried with a very weak magnet as well. But I ended up with looking for a second
hand one at 15 pounds. Hornby is crazy for their new spares parts for old stuff.
they charge about 20 pounds for a new driving unit of HST 125 intercity and a
new power car only costs 26 quids.
 

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Hi,

Could it be possible to use a Resistance soldering unit to supply the large current to re-magnetise the magnets?

Dennis

QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 6 Jan 2008, 05:50) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>***Neo is short for neodymium, a rare earth used for small string magnets. Changing to a NEO magnet will make motor power delivery higher, lower current draw, give smoother running generally.

The difference between "super Neo" and "Neo" is probably nothing much except the name.

You CAN remagnetise the old Ferrite magnets yourself but NOT if you aren't sure what U are doing and also a careful person - the voltage is low enough but the current draw is huge when doing it - burns can happen!

see the attached PDF

If you don;t already own the bits to make the magnetiser it'll cost more than new magnets, so in that case its going to be better to replace with Neo magnets or get a third party with a machine to do it really.

Richard
 
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