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which way is best to weather track and rust it ?

air brush or paint brush ?

if i popped into an art shop for acrylic paint, what colours would be best for rust and weathering please ?

thanks everyone
 

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In depth idiot
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I have used both brush and spray, both work for me. A brush can be easier if there is already scenery structure for cutting sides, retaining walls or overbridges in place, and a small brush is what I always use for rail sides and chairs. BTW, if it is not too late, on pointwork it is vastly easier to paint the railsides before permanently laying.

The shades that are required are the local soil colour(s), rust and filth. Ochres, tan leather, iron oxide, black are the sort of thing I would want, none to be used as they are, but blended to suit. After painting the rail sides with a 'rust and dirt mix', spray or wash on multiple dilute coats of the 'filth' (a half inch decorating brush is about right for 4mm) until you reach the required appearance. Plenty of good photographs for reference to the desired prototype appearance are very helpful at this stage.
 

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QUOTE (mikelhh @ 30 Aug 2007, 08:05) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I use cheap students acrylics - a mix of red oxide, black and a little green will give a good rusted look without being too red or orange.

I also use grey, but very thinned to improve the colour of Peco wooden sllepers, it is also possible to buy track grime as a colour but I can't remember who produces it.

Regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks mikelhh and britho.

i will pop out and get some from the local art shop.

by the way, is it in pots or what ?

is it expensive ?

thanks
andy
 

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QUOTE (BRITHO @ 30 Aug 2007, 13:30) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>It is also possible to buy track grime as a colour but I can't remember who produces it.

Phoenix Precision Paints produce a range of useful mini sprays, including "Sleeper Grime" and "Track Dirt", and lots more besides. See Phoenix Paints for the grubby details.
 

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Be sure to vary the weathering according to the location. For instance, in a station or locomotive depot with steam - in fact, anywhere where engines regularly come to a stand - almost everything, including the ballast, is black (except the rail head, of course) from the mixture of oil, coal dust and ash. The farther out you get, to the goods sidings and then the running lines, the lighter and rustier the weathering needs to be. If you are running close to the sea, then heavy, dark rust (from the salt spray) will be needed. In a late diesel or electric era layout, there will be lighter coloured weathering and rusting, but the greasy black lasted a very long time in yards where track was rarely relaid or reballasted. My branch line terminus is black or dark grey everywhere on the ground, and is just as I remember it, all but that heavenly bouquet of smoke and oil and creosote from the sleepers that could hang around a station yard for decades after the steam engines left.
 

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QUOTE (odiaz @ 30 Aug 2007, 23:36) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Any one use Tamiya paints to weather the tracks?

Regards from Spain,
Oscar

Hi Oscar,

Yes I use the Tamiya acrylics and find it to work very well. I make my own mixture of brown and grey colours until I have the rusty grimy colour I want. (Remember to keep a note of your paint formula for future reference). Most of the times I use an airbrush to apply the paint to the tracks before putting down the ballast.

I have found the acrylics to work better than enamal paint, especially when you have to clean the railheads after applying the paint.

Enjoy your hobby!

Kind regards.

Johan
 

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Tamiya acrylics work fantastically well in my Aztec air brush especially when thinned with acrylic thinners. I think this applies to most quality acrylics thinning is the key to a quality finish with light applications.
When weathering track, I much prefer using an old paint brush to run along the rails,it's highly therapeutic. It's impossible to tell if you've used enamel or acrylics and for ease of use alone acrylics win every time.
 

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I also prefer water based acrylic paints in all my weathering.

For the rails I use burnt sienna and a little bit of raw umber mixed together.

As for the wooden sleepers a chocalate matte can spray does the job. Before spraying I cover the rails with masking tape and leave the sleepers exposed. The rail sides are done with a number two water color brush.

Example of before and after as below:



Baykal
 

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I too use Tamiya acrylics, they seem to produce a lovely range of dull dirty colurs - just right for railway modelling. The problem down here is that hardly anyone sells it and my local stockist is about to close down.

Regards
 

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QUOTE (BRITHO @ 31 Aug 2007, 15:21) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I too use Tamiya acrylics, they seem to produce a lovely range of dull dirty colurs - just right for railway modelling. The problem down here is that hardly anyone sells it and my local stockist is about to close down.

Regards

I prefer an airbrush when weathering, usually starting with a light coat of "dark earth" to tone everything down and following up with a light coat of "black". On wagon/coach underframes I also like to use powders (umber, black and a bit of rust) to highlight the detail. I generally paint wheels a mix of "railroad tie brown, black and rust". I let the paint wear off the tyres while running.

I have tried dry brushing and washes but it doesn't work for me.

Don't buy the hobby powders, go to an art shop and get paint pigment.

For track, being basically lazy, after the laying is complete, I simply paint the whole thing with spray red oxide primer. The sleepers I paint "railroad tie brown" with a brush. I go back after the ballast is down and airbrush to blend the whole the whole thing together.

I use acrylics since these are easier to clean out of the airbrush.
 

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Weathering without tears

If you wish to expand this discussion slightly, look at this webpage.

Rail Painting:

For railpainting, I bought a US product that is a bottle with a long thin pipe that ends in a paint wheel,. simply roll along the side of the track. The paint is acyrlic but you can use enamels if you clean everything with thinners rather than water. Cost about $10 plus minimal postage but I cannot remember the name but they advertise in MR.
 

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QUOTE Has anyone tried the Rusty Rail applicator and paint question?

Err, I think I did mention the product just two posts ago, maybe you missed the comment? I just forgot the name that Bob supplied.
 
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