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Hello Chas,

I was trying to be helpful. Don't know how much info you have or require, but if I can help yoiu, I will. There are many pitfalls, especially for younger people who have to rely on (sometimes) questionable info. I actually experienced this period. I started trainspotting in 1947.

Stuart
 

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QUOTE (Ian Everitt @ 18 May 2014, 09:22) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>GWR certainly have a few named for people but they seem at first glance to be public figures and politicians rather than engineers or executives of the railway itself - although it was a very quick check so I should imagine there are a couple in there somewhere.


Daniel Gooch is the one that springs to mind but if you take away the Kings, Castles, Manors, Saints and Halls you're basically left with panniers.


Walter K Whigham was a director of the Bank of England and it's possibly indicative that the engine named after him is more famous than he ever was!

Hugh
 

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Try this web-site. Lots of info about A4's and good pictures in colour for guidelines.

http://www.lner.info/locos/A/a4.shtml

LNER (Gresley and Thompson) named a number of their locos after race horses some of which, in turn, had been named after bird species. They were horserace lovers not a bird watchers. The Thompson A2/3 were mostly named in this fashion.

The most authoratative publication on A4's was the LOCO PROFILE (No. 19 Gresley A4's December 1971); there was a whole series on different locos in the early 70's . This will give you a full history of the class. Possibly a local library may have a copy as it has been out of print for many years.

Regards

Mike
 

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Chas Levin
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Thanks to all those making recent replies
I have indeed made use of the lner.info and wiki pages, both very useful and informative!

To Stuart: I realised you were trying to be helpful, and I hope my reply didn't seem pedantic or ill-tempered as it wasn't meant to be. I was wary of being though to be someone who posts on forums asking to be spoon-fed info that is freely available online, which I know is considered a breech of forum etiquette by many people, so I wanted to clarify what I'd meant.

Although I had no trouble finding a re-number and re-spray job for a wartime black A4 (as mentioned earlier in this thread, I now have a superbly menacing looking 'Merlin' in a black 'cloak'!) I haven't yet found anyone who'll do the BR Blue, but I'm guessing you must know someone (or have done it yourself) as the models you mention having in Blue haven't all been available as RTR stock: is this a source you're happy to recommend?

And to Hugh: "Daniel Gooch is the one that springs to mind but if you take away the Kings, Castles, Manors, Saints and Halls you're basically left with panniers.
" - nicely put!!!


The names (not just A4 but named locos generally) are all rather commercial, architectural or aristocratic, plus the odd scientist or archeologist: no artists, writers or composers? There was a BR electric Sir Edward Elgar I think...?

Chas
 

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Chas,
The BR Sir Edward Elgar was a Diesel, Class 50 no. 50007, it still exists in preservation. It was painted GWR green & renamed from "Hercules" in 1985 for Elgar's centenary and the 150th anniversary of the GWR. All the Class 50s bore names of warships from around 1978. For a great set of names look up the Class 87 Electric locos, many of whose names appeared on steam locos of the past belonging to the LMS & LNER and their predecessors . I've always been fascinated by loco names and can recommend "Locomotive Names-An Illustrated History" by Jim Pike, published by The History Press in 2009 & the now out of print "Nameplates of the Big Four" published by OPC.

SWFRS
 

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QUOTE (Chas Levin @ 30 May 2014, 15:52) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The names (not just A4 but named locos generally) are all rather commercial, architectural or aristocratic, plus the odd scientist or archeologist: no artists, writers or composers? There was a BR electric Sir Edward Elgar I think...?

Chas

There is a few eg Terence Cuneo and not even in your list of professions John Peel!

Hugh
 

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Chas Levin
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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Ooh yes, I like the sound of a Castle Class Elgar (I'm a musician when I'm not running trains), but I couldn't accommodate the BR Class 50 as I don't really do diesels: the wife complains about the smell of the fumes


Thanks for the recommendations of book titles Sir William, I think one or other might be a worthwhile investment...

Odd they didn't turn to the arts a little more often in the search for loco names though: Purcell, Tennyson, Dickens - oh wait, there was a Shakespeare wasn't there?

OK, I definitely need a book about this don't I?


Another reason I'm interested btw is the usefulness for WAF (Wife Acceptance Factor) of having names that she likes, and my wife is a writer... some of you may scoff, but it works: for instance, my wife is half Welsh and the Welsh side are from a small village called Llansteffan where we go on a family holiday almost every year... so when I brought home the Hornby Castle Class 'Llansteffan Castle' the layout suddenly seemed like a Very Good Thing! Likewise 1st Class Pullmans named after wife and daughter...


Chas
 

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Chas Levin
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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Thanks Keith, that should indeed keep me busy fro a while :) Still seems as if they were a bit light on musicians, but I certainly stand corrected on what I thought was a lack of literary types!


To paraphrase Shakespeare (the writer, not Britannia 70004): "A loco by any other name would smell as sweet..."
 

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Odd they didn't turn to the arts a little more often in the search for loco names though.............

I seem to remember Sir Walter Scott was a source for a fair few names as was Robbie Burns and Mallory was also a source (depending on whom you choose to consider the origin of King Arthur).

The Welsh literary tradition does appear to be distinctly lacking in mainline loco names possibly due to difficulties in spelling or the potential length of the name plate itself


However, there's more than enough Welsh castles and other GWR engines with Welsh names and of course there is Owen Tudor.

Hugh
 

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Having come to this query regarding Walter K Whigham only now all I can say is that I know his son Jeremy and have often had a drink with him in the pub as he is a good friend of my sisters.
 

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Has Jeremy ever given you a description of WKW's work for the team financing Britain's war effort 1939-45? This is classic untold history of which the great majority have no awareness, of the financial underpinning that enabled purchase of the essential war materiel.
 

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I think even more so, Glenalmond was Alexander Hendersons Scottish estate also a GCR engine, then there was
D9 loco 'Sir Alexander'
replaced by D10 'Sir Alexander Henderson'
D11 was named 'Butler Henderson' by then also a GCR Director
Atlantic C4 364 was named Lady Henderson
so it is thought that the Hendesons had more names to their family than any other person, I may have missed one or more!
 

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He doesn't talk much about his early life and was only three when his father died but if I get the chance I'll ask.
Tim, he was my grandfather, not my father. He died when I was not quite 1 year old. I have wanted to respond to an earlier post suggesting that he was not a good golfer. He came from a family of outstanding golfers. His brother was twice US amateur champion and he (Walter) was Captain of St George's, Sandwich. He was a leading figure in the city of London in his day and a benefactor of many good causes.
 
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