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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As some of you may know, I'm starting to think about doing my first major layout - based on advice gathered around here, I may do a practice layout before tackling this major one - though I'm still doing all the theorising and all the rest.

One question that popped in my head, I have no idea if any of you would even know the answer, but it doesn't hurt to try... Anyway, I've noticed something interesting about Dutch NS Trains.... I have never seen any of them operating outside the borders of the Netherlands. On the Belgium/Netherlands border, the link is assured by mostly Belgian rolling stock, whilst the German/Netherlands border is assured by the DB.

I'd love to have Dutch rolling stock running on my layout - but how would I justify having Dutch inter-border traffic into my imaginary kingdom when the Dutch rolling stock in practice doesn't leave the country??

Anyone have any ideas how this could be justified?
 

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The reason may be something to do with loading gauges - or perhaps Dutch stock is built for the shorter journeys within Holland and is not suitable for long distance travel.

But on your own layout in your own "parallel universe" you can just say "That's what's happening here - such stock does run further afield." No other justification is required!

Regards,
John Webb
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for those ideas, fellas....

I'd be going for modern era Epoch V
- stuff that'd be rolling today!

Interesting that in the past Dutch stuff would go beyond the borders but no longer today.
 

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The Dutch Railways, or NS, relied heavily on electric motive power - however, as they used a voltage that was different from the DB´s, the Dutch electrics could not travel to Germany.

Diesels were scarce in The Netherlands, and the few were dearly needed for their own services. Germany had a far greater amount of diesel engines, and thereby could "afford" to have them go across the Dutch border. Same applies to the class 515 railcars.

In earlier times, or so I have read, the brake systems were incompatible. When The Netherlands were occupied by the Wehrmacht in WW2, the NS adapted the German brake system and thus could interchange, which was only possible with specially built equipment before. The same, btw, goes for Denmark.
 

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During the weekend I and dbclass50 came up with the theory that as there are no hills in Holland the Dutch locos weren't powerful enough to climb above sea level.


Sorry

Regards
 
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