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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Would 1 of thease do the job

Mountain Subdivision Hobbies

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NCE EB-3 Circuit Breaker

Features of the EB3:

>Provides short circuit protection for up to three power districts
>Trip current of each power district adjustable for 2, 3 or 4 Amps
>Easy hookup using screw terminals , no soldering
>Status indication LEDs for each output
>Additional opto-isolated outputs provided to feed signal circuits or
control panel indicators
>Adjustable short circuit response time
>Adjustable power-up response time to accommodate startup of sound
decoder equipped loco motives

Full handbook available on the NCE website here.

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I'm not personally familiar with the EB3 but it looks like it allows you to set up three power districts, for example the double-track branch and terminus, inner circuit (with depot/sidings) and outer circuit. That way a short circuit will only stop one section (unless you are unlucky enough to have a train "bridging" across two sections when this happens time). It will also help with fault finding but it might be a good idea to allow smaller sections of your layout to be electrically isolated in order to trace a short circuit. This will involve insulating the rails and creating a means of disconnecting the bus wires, for example a heavy-duty choc-block connector. If your layout consists of several baseboards that can be separated and unplugged then this will be good enough.

Can I also suggest you change your plan to include a left-handed (facing) crossover on the circuit, preferably between the through station and the sidings/depot entrance? Otherwise a train can start at the terminus, run down to the through station and end up in the sidings, but there is then no way to get it onto the outer circuit to return towards the terminus.
 

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'Fraid I haven't worked out how to post pics on this site so I'll try to explain. I am assuming that your double circuit is operated as a conventional double track, running on the left, so trains on the outer circuit go clockwise and anticlockwise on the inner one.

One possible position would be a left-handed crossover on the curve between the right hand end of the through platforms and the depot/sidings. Especially if these are carriage sidings then a train could then come out into one of the lower platforms and set off round the outer circuit a few times before going up to the terminus. If it is just a loco depot then this becomes less important. It is also a difficult place to put a crossover being a tight curve.

As an alternative you could put a crossover between the through station and the junction where the branch goes off to the terminus, where it may be a bit easier as there is some straight track. Either left-handed or right-handed would do here though left-handed would be better as it would allow trains from the depot/sidings to get onto the outer circuit before reversing. Assuming you use a left-handed, a train from the terminus would run round the inner circuit a few times and then terminate in one of the upper two platforms of the through station. The train could then reverse here and use the new crossover to get onto the outer circuit, go round a few times then back to the terminus. A right handed would allow trains to reverse in the bottom two platforms instead.
 
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